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For Reference 

Do Hoi Take 

From the Library 



Survey of the 

City of Virginia Beach 

Phase II 




Prepared for the Department of Historic Resources 

and 
The City of Virginia Beach Department of Planning 

by 
Traceries 



May 29, 1993 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/surveyofcityofviOOunse 



Table of Contents 

List of Illustrations OO N<5T R&V'Ovr- f- <"'« 

INTRODUCTION 

Project Purpose and Goals 5 

Survey Coverage and Study Area 6 

Organization of Final Report 6 

PROJECT METHODOLOGY 

Preliminary Research 8 

On-Site Survey 8 

Archival Research 9 

Oral History 10 

Computer Data Entry 10 

HISTORIC CONTEXT AND ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS 

Settlement Patterns 11 

Subsiste/ice/Agriculture 13 

Domestic 14 

Education 18 

Religion 19 

Commerce/Trade 20 

Recreation/Arts 21 

SURVEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

Summary and Analysis of Survey Findings 22 

Recommendations for Further Study 25 

Evaluation/Recommendation for Designation 26 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

APPENDIX 

Appendix A: listing of all properties in VDHR file number order. 
Appendix B: listing of all properties in name order. 
Appendix C: listing of properties surveyed to the intensive level. 
Appendix D: listing of properties marked on the USGS, but not surveyed. 
Appendix E: Preliminary Information Forms (PIF): 

Baxter House (134-351) 

Pocohantas Hunt Club (134-171) 

Ives House (134-362) 



VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM • DJP 

AlfiEBQ 144S4S 



List of Illustrations 

Figure 1 Map of the City of Virginia Beach 

Figure 2 Photograph of the former Princess Anne County Courthouse 

Figure 3 Photograph of Whitehurst Farm 

Figure 4 Photograph of Barn at Whitehurst Farm 

Figure 5 Photograph of Davis Farm 

Figure 6 Photograph of Farm Buildings at Davis Farm 

Figure 7 Photograph of Farm Buildings at the 3004 Seaboard Road 

Figure 8 Photograph of the Woodhouse House 

Figure 9 Photograph of the Thomas Lovett House 

Figure 10 Photograph of the Isaac Murry House 

Figure 11 Photograph of the Baxter House 

Figure 12 Photograph of the Bell House 

Figure 13 Photograph of Ferry Farm 

Figure 14 Photograph of the Gresham-Ives House 

Figure 15 Photograph of the James House 

Figure 16 Photograph of the Farmhouse at 773 Princess Anne Road 

Figure 17 Photograph of Brown's Tavern 

Figure 18 Photograph of Oak Grove 

Figure 19 Photograph of Fisher House 

Figure 20 Photograph of House, 3820 Charity Neck Road 

Figure 21 Photograph of House, Salem Road 

Figure 22 Photograph of 144 Princess Anne Road 

Figure 23 Photograph of 2365 Princess Anne Road 



Figure 24 Photograph of the Pungo Grill 

Figure 25 Photograph of the Pleasant Ridge School 

Figure 26 Photograph of Old Charity School Auditorium 

Figure 27 Photograph of Creeds Elementary School 

Figure 28 Photograph of Nimmo Church 

Figure 29 Photograph of Tabernacle United Methodist Church 

Figure 30 Photograph of Salem United Methodist Church 

Figure 31 Photograph of Store, Princess Anne Road 

Figure 32 Photograph of Store at Creeds 

Figure 33 Photograph of Napa Auto Parts Store 

Figure 34 Photograph of the Horn Point Club 

Figure 35 Photograph of the Pocohontas Fowling Club 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 5 



SECTION I INTRODUCTION 



A. Project Purpose and Goals 



In January 1993, the Virginia Department of Historic Resources contracted with Traceries to 
conduct a survey of the historic resources in the southern portion of the City of Virginia Beach. 
This survey, conducted for the Department of Historic Resources and the City of Virginia Beach 
Department of Planning, was the second phase of a survey of the entire City of Virginia Beach, 
begun in the fall of 1991. Traceries, a Washington, D.C.-based consulting firm concerned with 
architectural history and preservation, provided overall management of the Phase II survey, 
conducted the archival research and on-site survey, and prepared the final report. These findings, 
together with the findings of the Phase I survey of the City of Virginia Beach, prepared by 
Frazier Associates, July 1992, have resulted in a complete listing of the City's historic resources. 

The goal of the project was to conduct a comprehensive survey of the southern portion of the 
City of Virginia Beach, identifying the area's historic resources including buildings, structures, and 
sites 50 years old or older. The contract required Traceries to survey and document 295 of these 
identified properties— 221 to a reconnaissance level and 74 to an intensive level. 

The scope of work included the following activities: 

1. provide survey forms completed to the appropriate levels along with photographs 
for each surveyed property; 

2. provide narrative and statistical architectural descriptions of the properties surveyed; 

3. place the surveyed properties within the historical context of the growth and 
development of the City of Virginia Beach based on the historic themes 
recognized by VDHR and developed by Frazier Associates during the Phase I 
survey; 

4. evaluate the significance of these resources and make recommendations for 
potential National Register Nominations. 

Mid-way through the survey, however, it became apparent that the numbers identified in the 
contract were unrealistic based upon the number of historic resources actually standing in the 
survey area. In March, 1993, Traceries had covered the entire survey area in its entirety and had 
surveyed 164 properties (134 reconnaissance and 30 intensive). Because of this discrepancy in the 
number of properties surveyed versus the number of properties to be surveyed as outlined in the 
contract, the survey goals were revised. It was agreed that in addition to the survey and 
documentation of the 164 properties already surveyed Traceries would: 

1) Conduct reconnaissance or intensive-level surveys on properties outside the Phase II survey 
area that were either not surveyed during Phase I or were surveyed to the reconnaissance-level 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 6 

and require intensive-level investigation. This list will consist of approximately ten properties and 
as supplied by Robert Davis at the City of Virginia Beach Department of Planning. 

2) Conduct further research on three properties determined potentially eligible for the National 
Register of Historic Places. Based upon the research and site investigation, Preliminary 
Information Requests Forms (PIFs), will be prepared. 

3) Conduct final presentation to community. In addition to the required presentation to be 
delivered to the Virginia Beach City Council, Traceries will present a final slideshow to the local 
community. This presentation will be held on the evening of the same day of the City Council 
meeting. 

The principal purpose of the project was to provide the county with an accurate listing and 
assessment of the area's resources for informational purposes and to generate a public awareness 
of historic preservation. The revised goals accomplished this objective. As a result, a total of 175 
properties were surveyed (32 to the intensive level); three PIF forms were prepared; and a public 
meeting regarding the survey project has been scheduled. 

As completed the work both fulfilled the contractual requirements and provided the City v^th 
positive preservation action that will provide appeal to the local residents. 



B. Survey Coverage and Study Area 

Located in southeastern Virginia, the City of Virginia Beach is bounded on the east by the 
Atlantic Ocean, on the west by the City of Chesapeake, on the south by the North Carolina 
border, and on the north by the Chesapeake Bay (Figure 1). The survey area consisted of the 
southern half of the City of Virginia Beach, bounded by the North Carolina border on the south 
and by Dam Neck Road on the north. The survey included this entire southern portion of the 
City, with the exception of False Cape State Park. This wildlife area is state property and had 
been included in a state property survey conducted by the Department of Historic Resources 
within the past 10 years. The City was systematically surveyed in the entire southern portion; in 
addition, survey work was completed outside of the survey boundaries at the request of Robert 
Davis, Planner for the City of Virginia Beach Planning Department and contact person for this 
project. 

C. Organization of the Final Report 

The report is organized into four sections, including Introduction (Section I), Survey Methodology 
(Section II), Historic Context and Architectural Analysis (Section III), and Survey Findings and 
Recommendations (Section IV), with additional information presented in the appendices. The 
Survey Methodology provides a detailed explanation of the survey procedure and scope of work. 
The Historic Context and Architectural Analysis is an update of the historic context prepared by 
Frazier Associates in July 1992. The context is divided into chapters by historic themes and 
identifies those newly surveyed properties which fall within the themes developed by Frazier 
Associates. Survey Findings and Recommendations provides details of the findings of the survey, 






Shtp ^hoai /i 




Figure 1: Map of the City of Virginia Beach 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 7 

evaluates the architectural and historic significance of the surveyed properties and makes 
recommendations for nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. 

Appendix A includes a listing of all properties in VDHR file number order. 
Appendix B includes a listing of all properties in name order. 
Appendix C includes a listing of properties surveyed to the intensive level. 
Appendix D includes a listing of properties marked on the USGS, but not surveyed. 
Appendix E includes three Preliminary Information Forms (PIF): 

Baxter House (134-351) 

Pochohantas Hunt Club (134-171) 

Ives House (134-362) 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 8 

SECTION II SURVEY METHODOLOGY 



A. Preliminary Research 

Prior to initiating the field survey, Traceries collected the necessary U.S. Geological Survey 
(USGS) Maps of the southern portion of the City of Virginia Beach and compiled already existing 
information on previously identified and surveyed historic resources in the area. This information 
was collected at the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (VDHR) and the City of Virginia 
Beach Planning Department. The VDHR survey data included information on approximately. 30 
architectural sites identified during a survey conducted by a Virginia Historic Landmarks 
Commission survey in 1970, as well as information collected during a Historic American Buildings 
Inventory survey of Virginia in the 1950s, as well as other random survey forms. A Virginia 
Department of Transportation (VDOT) Survey was also conducted in the area, however, because 
of the limited amount and type of information collected during this survey, the files were not 
collected. 

The City of Virginia Beach Planning Department provided a copy of the Phase I Survey Report 
completed by Frazier Associates in July 1992 and a copy of an Inventory of Historic Buildings and 
Sites Report, prepared by the Office of Research and Strategic Analysis of the City of Virginia 
Beach, March 1990. 

Based on the above survey records, Traceries indicated on the USGS maps all of the previously 
identified sites in the survey area, as well as properties listed on the National Register of Historic 
Places. The compilation of previous findings and the marked-up USGS maps provided the 
framework from which Traceries began the on-site study of the southern portion of the City of 
Virginia Beach. 

B. On-site Survey 

The on-site survey was supervised by Kimberly Williams and conducted by Laura Trieschmann 
and Marie Ryan of Traceries in the period from Februrary 1993-May 1993. The two-member 
team worked together to map, survey and photograph the historic sites. The team mapped the 
route, identified the sites to be surveyed, completed the survey forms, and photographed the sites. 
When owners or residents of the properties were present, the survey project was introduced to 
them and informal oral histories were conducted. 

Using the USGS maps, the survey team investigated every paved and unpaved road leading to a 
marked property within the entire survey area. If a property was inaccessible due to unpassable 
road conditions or because of a locked gate, the survey team surveyed the property from a 
distance or marked it on the U.S.G.S. Map. 

If a property was accessible and determined to be 50 years or older, one of three events occurred: 
the property was surveyed to the intensive level; the property was surveyed to the reconnaissance 
level; the property was noted on the USGS Map, but not surveyed. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
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The survey proposal required a survey of properties at the reconnaissance level and at the 
intensive level. The level of examination was dependent upon several factors including, but not 
limited to the following: 1) the date of construction; 2) the level of architectural significance; 3) 
the level of historical significance; 4) the condition of the property; 5) the integrity of the 
property; 6) the distinctiveness of the building type; 7) degree of representation of the building 
type; and 8) potential threat to the property. In general, a property was surveyed to the intensive 
level if it contained one or more resources built before the Civil War, or if one or more resources 
on the property was a particularly good example of a type or style of construction; or if a group of 
historic resources existed as a cohesive complex. When a property was surveyed to the intensive 
level versus the reconnaissance level, the form was more completely filled-out and more 
photographs and slides were taken of the property. When possible, the interior of the primary 
and secondary resources were visited, photographs were taken and interior descriptions were 
written. If the interior was not accessible upon first visit, every attempt was made to contact the 
owner and visit and photograph the interior at a later date. In many cases, however, the owners 
did not wish to have the interiors photographed. 

As outlined in the revised survey goals, the survey team also noted properties in the county that 
are 50 years or older but that were not chosen to be individually surveyed. This information is 
listed by address as Appendix D of this report. This listing identifies the property, its address, its 
building use and the approximate date of construction. 

In surveying the properties, special care was taken to examine all resources located on the 
property. If any outbuildings and dependencies contributed to the significance of the property, a 
secondary resource survey form was completed and the structure was photographed. Special 
attention was paid to early outbuildings and farm structures, as well as significant buildings in poor 
or threatened condition. When an owner or tenant was present, the survey team inquired about 
the property's development and captured relevant oral histories. 

The survey of the City of Virginia Beach resulted in an examination of all buildings 50 years or 
older. The survey was an important step in updating existing records on the area's historic 
resources and in assessing newly identified architecture for its importance at a county, state, and 
federal level. 

C. Archival Research 

The Phase II Survey of the City of Virginia Beach was primarily an on-site study and required 
limited archival research. Research into the history of the City of Virginia Beach was limited to a 
general understanding of the area's history based upon the final report prepared by Frazier 
Associates and published records. The Phase I Survey of Virginia Beach, conducted by Frazier 
Associates, provided an historic context of the entire City of Virginia Beach. This context was 
updated to include buildings identified during the Phase II Survey. 

Published records which were located at the Virginia State Library and Archives in Richmond, 
included: The Beach, A History of Virginia Beach. Virginia ; Old Houses in Princess Anne 
Virginia : Meet Marshall Parks, Founder of Virginia Beach ; Princess Anne County and Virginia 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 10 

Beach : A Pictorial History of Virginia Beach . Another book, Gun Clubs and Decoys of Back Bay 
and Currituck Sound , was given to Traceries by the author, Archie Johnson. 



D. Oral Histories 

An intrinsic aspect of surveying historic properties involves conducting casual oral histories of 
local property owners and residents. In general when a property is being surveyed, the owner is 
interviewed for his knowledge of the property and the individual resources on the property and 
the information is captured at that time. 



£. Computer Data Entry 

All of the on-site and archival survey findings were entered into VDHR's Integrated Preservation 
Software (IPS) system. This system, called VDHR-IPS, allows for information to be entered into 
the computer and stored and then sorted and enumerated for accurate and consistent accounts of 
study findings. Computer reports can be generated to produce frequency counts on appropriate 
fields, itemized historic events, and associated individual reports, chronological reports, as well as 
reports based on specific data fields such as architectural style, material, interior plan and the like. 
IPS was an important component of the survey of the City of Virginia Beach. All of the statistics 
and number counts have been computer-generated, based on on-site and archival findings entered 
into the computer system. The information on the computer can be continuously updated and 
added to as new historic sites are discovered, or new information regarding an already-catalogued 
site surfaces. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 11 

SECTION ni HISTORIC CONTEXT AND ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS 



This historic context and architectural analysis is an update of the historic context developed by 
Frazier Associates. Historic resources identifled and surveyed during the Phase II Survey were 
placed within the appropriate theme. For the development of these themes, refer to the 
"Reconnaissance Architectural Survey Report, City of Virginia Beach," Frazier Associates, July 
1992. Below is an analysis of those notable historic resources surveyed during this phase that fit 
within the identified theme(s). 



THEME: SETTLEMENT PATTERNS 

SURVEYED RESOURCES: 

Within the survey area, two settlement areas were surveyed, including Princess Anne Courthouse 
and Pungo. In 1824, Princess Anne Courthouse, located in the geographic center of the county, 
was established as the 6th and last location of the County Courthouse. In the early years after its 
establishment, the Courthouse emerged as a small, but thriving village and commercial district. In 
1835, Princess Anne Courthouse had 150 inhabitants, the "usual county buildings," and seventeen 
dwellings. The village served as a trading center for the surrounding farming area and, in order to 
serve the county seats, several inns and other businesses were established in the new village. One 
such inn which was built shortly after the establishment of the village stood until 1899 when it was 
destroyed by fire. An historic photograph of the inn is found in Princess Anne County and 
Virginia Beach, A Pictorial History . 

Throughout the 19th century, Princess Anne Courthouse remained a small community that did 
not grow much beyond its early 19th century size. In 1924, the Courthouse contained 300 people, 
two stores, the J.M. Bratten Lumber Co. factory, and a "splendid school and auditorium."^ The 
Courthouse was "restored" with additions and new Georgian -style buildings, modelled after 
Williamsburg, have been erected to house the public buildings and offices of the city. 

Today, only the 1820s brick courthouse building survives from the Courthouse's mid-19th century 
period of significance. This building, erected 1824, has been heavily altered and extensively 
documented. The two-story structure is constructed of Remish bond brick with a hipped roof of 
slate tile. The front portico is supported by two-story tuscan columns with a denticulated cornice. 
In 1920, the building was renovated and enlarged to its present size of four by three bays with a 
one-story wing and covered passageway on the north elevation (Figure 2). 



^ E.E. Ferebee and J. Pendleton Wilson, Jr. An Economic and Social Survey of Princess Anne County . (Charlottesville: Uniyersity 
of Virginia Record Extension Series, May, 1924), p. 33. Taken from "Reconnaissance Architectural Survey Report. City of Virginia 
Beach," Frazier Associates, July 1992, p.5. 




Figure 2: Photograph of the former Princess Anne County Courthouse 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 12 

The two-story brick jail, which served as such until 1947, was finally demolished in March 1964 
when the chimney collapsed causing $50.00 damage.^ 

The other settlement area surveyed was Pungo. Pungo, located in the south central section of the 
City of Virginia Beach, was first established as the termination of the Bennett Steam Boat Line, 
and later the site of a railroad line which ran from Norfolk to Munden Point. The Munden Point 
Train was called the Sportsmen Special because it brought the hunter's and fisherman from the 
resort to their clubs.^ By the early 20th century, Pungo had become a prosperous agricultural 
center. In 1924, the village boasted of 100 residents, two large merchandise establishments, two 
garages, a fish-packing plant, a Ford service agency and "good church and school facilities.'"* 
Today, Pungo survives as an important crossroads community that offers stores, restaurants and 
other commercial concerns. The crossroads area includes several convenience stores, two gas 
stations, an antique store, and two restaurants. Located just beyond the Pungo area are the 
library, community center, police station, and elementary school. 



^ Kathleen M. Eighmey, The Beach, A History of Virginia Beach . (Virginia Beach, Virginia: The City of Virginia Beach, 
Department of Public Libraries, 1976.) p. 46. 



^ Eighmey, p. 71. 



* Frazier Associates, p. 7. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 13 

THEME: SUBSISTENCE/AGRICULTURE 

SURVEYED RESOURCES: 

The majority of the southern portion of the City of Virginia Beach is rural in nature and still 
contains working farms that have evolved over time to accommodate modern equipment and 
technology. For this reason, many of the farm complexes from the 19th century no longer retain 
agricultural buildings from this period. While many late 19th century farmhouses survive intact, 
and will be discussed in the Domestic Theme, few barns and agricultural buildings were identified. 

Of the 97 farm complexes surveyed, the Whitehurst Farm (134-248), the Davis Farm (134-721), 
and the farm complex located at 3004 Seaboard Road (134-688) deserve particular mention. The 
Whitehurst Farm, located at 3312 Charity Neck Road, dates from the mid-to-Iate 19th century. 
Although not presently a working farm, the Whitehurst Farm is surrounded by fields and retains 
many of its original farm buildings (Figure 3). The site contains a kitchen, corn crib, sweet potato 
house, outhouse, icehouse, three barns, and five sheds. The buildings, all within close proximity 
to the farm house, are on brick pier foundations with standing seam metal gable roofs. The wood 
weatherboard kitchen retains its interior end chimney and six-light fixed window. The corn crib, 
with a wood shingle roof and exposed roof rafters, has vertical and horizontal wood weatherboard 
walls. The main barn, with the only known alteration on the farm, has been covered with license 
plates, the oldest dating from 1933. The barns structures all have machine -wrought square nails 
(Figure 4). 

The Davis Farm, located at 5857 Providence Road, was established in the late 19th century 
(Figure 5). The area around the farm has been compromised by highways and residential 
subdivisions, yet the Farm still retains a small agricultural field to the east. The eleven farm 
buildings on the site are within close proximity to the dwelling and have little or no known 
alterations. The site consists of three late 19th century barns, three vertical board sheds, a wood 
frame weatherboard ice house and outhouse, two chicken coops, and a kitchen building (Figure 
6). The older vertical board buildings, although greatly deteriorated, have machine-wrought 
square nails, exposed roof rafters. 

The Farm located at 3004 Seaboard Road dates from the late 19th century. The farm house no 
longer exists and several contemporary structures have been constructed on the site. The two 
barns, eight sheds, outhouse, and kitchen building are all currently being utilized by the working 
farm. The vertical board shed have front gable roofs and no foundations. The wooden 
weatherboard barns and remaining sheds are front gable with brick foundations. The buildings 
are all constructed with machine-wrought square nails and are covered with standing seam metal 
roofs (Figure 7). 




Figure 3: Photograph of Whitehurst Farm 





Figure 4: Photograph of Barn at Whitehurst Farm 




Figure 5: Photograph ol" Davis Farm 




Figure 6: Photograph of Farm Buildings at Davis Farm 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 14 

THEME: DOMESTIC 
SURVEYED RESOURCES 

Early Settlement Period ri570-17891 

The surviving eighteenth-century domestic architecture in Princess Anne County reflects the 
growth of the planter class and its increasingly prosperous lifestyle. At least two dwellings, the 
Francis Land House and the Lower Wolfsnare Plantation were identified by Frazier Associates 
during the Phase I survey as residences from this time period. An additional three buildings from 
this period were identified during the second phase of the survey, including the Jonathan 
Woodhouse House (134-38); the Thomas Lovett House (134-72); and the Isaac Murry House 
(134-723). All three of these houses are of similar building size, shape and form. The Jonathan 
Woodhouse House, located at 2380 London Bridge Road, was built ca. 1760 by a member of the 
locally prominent Woodhouse family. The 1-1/2-story brick structure with Flemish bond walls is 
three-bays wide and features a central-passage plan. The house is covered with a gambrel roof 
with three regularly spaced shed-roof dormers (Figure 8). Large brick chimneys with corbelled 
caps buttress the end walls of the house. In 1981, the house suffered a serious fire that gutted 
the interior and destroyed the roof. The house was rebuilt following the fire and a frame addition 
was added to its east end wall. 

Like the Woodhouse House, the Lovett House, built ca. 1772, is a 1-1/2-story, center-passage-plan 
dwelling covered with a distinctive gambrel roof with shed roof dormers (Figure 9). Unlike the 
brick Woodhouse House, the Lovett House is constructed of frame with weatherboard walls and 
is five, instead of three bays wide. 

The Isaac Murry House, located outside the survey area at 3300 Harlie Court Road^, was 
constructed ca. 1786 and similarly features a distinctive gambrel roof. The 1-1/2-story, central- 
passage-plan house is built with brick walls laid in Flemish bond (Figure 10). The house is 
currently set within a development with a circular drive and residential yard in front. Despite its 
loss of setting, the house survives, along with a brick outbuilding as a fine local example of this 
rural Georgian house form. 



Early National Period ri789-1830') 

The end of the eighteenth century was a period of considerable change in Virginia. The almost 
exclusively agrarian society was beginning to accommodate urban centers and small hamlets, while 
farming continued to be the primary means of livelihood. The county's economic development is 
reflected in its architecture. Prosperous farmers began replacing small one- and two-room 
colonial dwellings with larger residences having floorplans that promoted greater privacy. The 
Federal house, a two-story dwelling with a central passage and one -or two-room-deep plan, first 
emerged at this time in Virginia to eventually become the state's prevailing building form. In the 



^ Located outside the original survey boundaries, the Isaac Murry House was surveyed at the request of Robert Davis at the City 
of Virginia Beach Department of Planning, as part of the revised Scope of Work to this project. 




Figure 7: Photograph of Farm Buildings at the 3004 Seaboard Road 




Figure 8: Photograph of the Woodhouse House 




Figure 9: Photograph of the Thomas Lovett House 




Figure 10: Photograph of the Isaac Murr\- House 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
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City of Virginia Beach, the second phase of the survey identified three early National-era houses, 
including, most notably, the Bell House (134-003); the Baxter House (134-351); and Ferry Farm 
(134-11). 

The Baxter House, constructed in 1857 by Isaac N. Baxter,^ is a two-and-one-half-story side gable 
dwelling on a raised three-course American Bond brick foundation (Figure 11) Constructed of 
frame clad with beaded weatherboard, the house has a front portico with square posts and turned 
balustrade. Originally the Baxter House had two interior end chimneys with corbelled caps of 
which only one remains. The interior of the center-passage plan house features original federal 
mantels, wainscoting, beaded walls, chair rails, and crown molding. 

The Bell House, built in 1820 by Joshua James,^ is a two-story side gable dwelling with double 
interior end chimneys. The central-hall, double-passage brick structure is pierced by 6/6 double- 
hung wood sash windows with a segmental arched cornice. In 1952, the United States Navy 
purchased the Bell House to be used as a residence for the Commander of the Oceana Naval Air 
Station (Figure 12). 

Like the Bell House, Ferry Farm was constructed in the early 19th century. The two-and-one- 
half-story, three-course American bond brick building has a side gable roof with two interior end 
brick chimneys (Figure 13). The farm house originally was three bays wide and covered in stucco. 
Two-story wing additions and square columned porticoes have been added, dramatically altering 
the exterior appearance of the dwelling. The interior floor plan originally was three rooms with 
an enclosed quarter-turn stair to the right of the front entry. Interior architectural features 
include: beaded board walls and ceihngs, built-in cabinets, Federal style mantels, wide hard wood 
floor boards, chair rails, and wainscoting. The building was constructed with square machine- 
made nails, mortis and tenon joined by wooden pegs, and horse-hair plaster. 



Pre-and Post-Civil War Era ri830-1870) 

The architecture of this period ranges from the modest one- and two-story frame dwelling forms 
that characterized the vernacular architecture of rural Virginia in the 18th and 19th centuries to 
the more substantial and elaborate brick buildings generally constructed by the planter class prior 
to the Civil War. In the Phase II survey of the City of Virginia Beach, 26 dwellings were 
identified from this time period. Approximately eight of these Civil War-era buildings share 
similar form, massing and architectural details that can best be described as the two-and-one-half- 
story, three -bay house with paired end chimneys. In particular, two of these examples include, the 
Gresham-Ives House (134-362) and the James House (134-59). 

The Gresham-Ives (Figure 14) and the James Houses (Figure 15), constructed in 1857 and 1859 
respectively, are identical in form and plan. The houses are two-and-one-half-story, three-bay- 



*Isaac N. Baxter, Estate Tax Assessment Records, 1856-1858. 



^Mansfield, Stephen S., Princess Anne County and Virginia Beach . (Norfolk. VA:Donning Company, 1989). p. 53. 




Figure 11: Photograph of the Baxter House 




■-^^^ 




Figure 12: Photograph of Bel! House 



/, --M 




Figure 13: Photograph of Ferry Farm 





Figure 14: Photograph of Gresham-Ives House 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 16 

wide by three-bay-deep houses with double exterior end brick chimneys. The interior floor plans 
of the dwellings are side-passage, double parlor with straight-flight stairs. 

The Farmhouse at 773 Princess Anne Road (134-367) survives as a good example of a 1-1/2-story 
dwelling that was typical of the vernacular architecture of Virginia in the 18th and 19th centuries. 
This house, originally a hall-parlor house was later extended to become a central-passage-plan 
house (Figure 16). 

Brown's Tavern (134-06) provides a good example of the rarer and more substantial dwelling 
forms found in the area. This house, a two-and-one-half-story brick building built ca. 1832, is 
designed in a transitional Federal-Italianate style (Figure 17). While the general massing and 
certain details, including the flat stone lintels and the five-course American bond brick work is 
typical of Federal period architecture, while the overhanging eaves and bracketed wood cornice 
are more characteristic of the Italianate style. This house, located on the historically prominent 
road now called General Booth Boulevard, is known locally to have served as a tavern for 
travellers heading north and south. A frame kitchen wing was added to the house in the mid-19th 
century. 



Reconstruction Period to World War I a870-1914) 

The rural farmhouses of the late nineteenth century in Princess Anne County are predominantly 
two-story, three-bay farmhouses with or without a rear ell that are referred to as I-houses or L- 
houses. More than one third, or 70, of the total number of buildings surveyed fall within this 
category. Several of these rural farmhouses have one-story rear ell additions to the rear that 
provide kitchen space, which was not necessarily included in the original floor plan. 

I-house, L-house: 

Grouped together in a single category, the I-House and L-House generally represent two-story, 
single-pile dwellings with end chimneys and slightly different floor plans. The I-house features a 
rectangular floor plan, while the L-house, with two-story rear ells, have floor plans with an L 
shape. Although these farmhouses can be easily categorized and labelled as either an I-house or 
L-house, several variations of each form exist. Variations include foundation type, chimney type 
and placement, porch type and placement, and decorative treatment. For a complete list of the I- 
and L-houses in the survey area, see Table 1. 

These farmhouses, with their slight variations in form, range in date from the mid-nineteenth 
century to the early twentieth century and are the most representative type of architecture in the 
area. A few notable examples of this domestic house form include. Oak Grove (134-305), and the 
now abandoned Fisher House (134-62). 

Oak Grove, located at 700 Princess Anne Road, is a ornate example of a gabled L-House with a 
wrap-around porch (Figure 18). The projecting gable is ornamented with square and diamond- 
shaped shingles. The walls are wood weatherboard with cornerboards. While the windows of the 
now vacant Oak Grove are missing, the projecting lintels are present. The cross gable roof is 





Figure 15: Photograph of James House 




Figure 16: Photograph of the Farmhouse at 773 Princess Anne Road 



VDHR-IPS-Generated Report 

I-Houses and L-Houses of Virginia Beach 

VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/28/1993 



Architectural 
Configuration 



134-0040- 


1880-1900 


1620 


134-0043- 


1794 


2565 


134-0057- 


1772-1765 


1489 


134-0059- 


1839-1859 


2061 


134-0062- 


1888 


1569 


134-0069- 


1880-1910 


2380 


134-0170- 


1890-1910 


256 


134-0173- 


1867 


268 


134-0176- 


1880-1910 


448 


134-0179- 


1880-1900 


1540 


134-0181- 


1880-1910 


480 


134-0183- 


1880-1910 


5980 


134-0186- 


1880-1900 


5657 


134-0188- 


1890-1910 




134-0189- 


1880-1990 


512 


134-0196- 


1880-1910 




134-0197- 


1880-1910 


1369 


134-0218- 


1880-1890 


1409 


134-0229- 


1880-1910 


4048 


134-0231- 


1870-1900 


2980 


134-0243- 


1920-1940 


1809 


134-0246- 


1870-1880 


1328 


134-0247- 


1860-1880 


1448 


134-0248- 


1860-1880 


3312 


134-0254- 


1880-1910 


3820 


134-0255- 


1880-1910 


3864 


134-0257- 


1880-1910 


3936 


134-0261- 


1890-1910 


1377 


134-0272- 


1860-1880 


1501 


134-0276- 


1886 


1833 


134-0279- 


188.0-1910 


1585 


134-0282- 


1880-1910 


1512 
3936 


134-0290- 


1860-1880 


643 


134-0305- 


1880-1910 


700 


134-0308- 


1880-1910 


2245 


134-0333- 


1880-1910 


2761 




TABLE 1: 


I-H 



Princess Anne Road 
Seaboard Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Pleasant Ridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Back Bay Landing Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Fitztown Road 
Fitztown Road 
Fitztown Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Munden Road 
Munden Road 
Driun Point Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
Horn Point Road 
North Muddy Creek Rd. 
1448 North Muddy Creek Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Princess Anne Road 
1501 Gum Bridge Road 
Gum Bridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Pleasant Ridge Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Old Pungo Ferry Road 
West Gibbs Road 
I-HOUSES AND L-HOUSES IN 



I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

L-house 

L-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 
L-house 
L-house 
I-house 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



I-Houses and L-Houses of Virginia Beach 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/28/1993 

Architectural 

Configuration 



134-0334- 


1880-1910 


3001 


134-0337- 


1880-1910 


5420 


134-0350- 


1880-1910 


3194 


134-0351- 


1790-1820 


3173 


134-0354- 


1880-1890 


3413 


134-0359- 


1860-1880 


4490 


134-0362- 


1820-1860 


4152 


134-0364- 


1880-1910 


756 


134-0390- 


1880-1910 


1241 


134-0392- 


1860-1880 


1255 


134-0393- 


1880-1910 


1258 


134-0395- 


1880-1910 


2200 


134-0396- 


1870-1890 


2254 


134-0404- 


1894 


1464 


134-0408- 


1894 


1504 


134-0550- 


1880-1900 


1533 


134-0667- 


1880-1910 




134-0670- 


1880-1910 


1309 


134-0673- 


1880-1900 


1560 


134-0677- 


1880-1910 


1416 


134-0683- 


1880-1900 


1817 


134-0686- 


1880-1900 




134-0687- 


1880-1910 


3045 


134-0692- 


1880-1910 




134-0695- 


1850-1880 


2384 


134-0697- 


1880-1910 


2545 


134-0700- 


1880-1910 


3000 


134-0707- 


1880-1910 


4153 


134-0715- 


1880-1910 


2552 


134-0717- 


1880-1910 


2004 


134-0718- 


1880-1910 


1053 


134-0719- 


1903-1910 


4600 


134-0720- 


1880-1910 


3877 


134-0721- 


1880-1910 


5857 



Head River Road 
Blackwater Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Blackwater Road 
Blackwater Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Vaughan Road 
Vaughan Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Salem Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
Princess Anne Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
North Muddy creek Road 
Seaboard Road 
Salem Road 
Princess Anne Road 
West Landing Road 
West Landing Road 
Indian River Raod 
West Landing Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Old Princess Anne Road 
Charity Neck Road 
Providence Road 



L-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

l-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

L-house 

L-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

I-house 

L-house 

L-house 

L-house 

L-house 

I-house 



70 RECORDS IN THIS REPORT 




Figure 17: Photograph of Brown's Tavern 



"< -.. 




r.s« 



T"^:^ ■- 






Figure 18: Photograph of Oak Grove 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 17 

pierced by to interior corbel capped windows. The interior floor plan is central-hall with three 
rooms, with the straight-flight stair in the hall. 

The Fisher House is located at 1569 Princess Anne Road (Figure 19). It was constructed in 1888 
in the I-House form with exterior end chimneys. The side gable standing seam metal roof is 
decorated by wide cornice and returns. Typical of the area, the front porch is supported by 
tapered square posts on brick bases. 

Other notable examples of the I-House and L-House form include, 3820 Charity Neck Road (134- 
254) (Figure 20), 1533 Salem Road (134-550) (Figure 21), 468 Princess Anne Road (134-177), 
and 448 Princess Anne Road (134-176). 



World War I to Present a914-Present^ 

During this period America became a predominantly urban nation and the number of operating 
farms began to decline. Small bungalow-type dwellings, as well as mail-order houses can be found 
along the roads in both isolated locations and in clusters. This type of housing was inexpensive 
and appealed to the moderate-income family who purchased land, along the main county roads, 
from the farmers. Good examples of such houses can be seen along Princess Anne Road where a 
number of bungalows face the road. These dwellings are predominately 1-1/2-story with front 
gable roofs and interior chimneys. Examples of the bungalow style include, 144 Princess Anne 
Road (134-713) (Figure 22) and 2365 Princess Anne Road (134-709) (Figure 23). 

Mail-order houses were prevalent to this period and an excellent example can be 
found in the crossroads of Pungo. The Pungo Grill (134-666), located at 1785 
Princess Anne Road, was constructed in 1919 from an "Alladin" house kit (Figure 
24).^ The craftsman style dwelling, since rehabilitated into a restaurant, still bares 
the original stenciled instructions indicating where each piece was to be placed. 
The cross gable roof overhangs with exposed rafters to encompass the wrap- 
around porch. The porch is supported by square posts on brick bases and has 
been enclosed with wood shingles and glass to provide additional seating for the 
restaurant. The interior irregular floor plan contains architectural detailing such as 
a denticulated mantel, beaded walls, and picture molding. 



Conclusion 

The majority of the domestic architecture in the City of Virginia Beach reflects a 
vernacular tradition in building that is found throughout rural Virginia. From the 
eighteenth to the twentieth century, this vernacular tradition has relied on simple 
but evolving forms with little or no ornamentation. The 19th century is 
characterized primarily by the I- and L-House forms, while early to mid-twentieth 
century architecture is repeated by the craftsman cottage and the bungalow 



^Information obtained from present owner, Wayne Richard, March 3, 1993. 




--'S^a^irj^ 



Figure 19: Photograph ol" Fisher House 





•■''^^-^ 




Figure 20: Photograph of House. 3920 Charity Neck Road 




Figure 21: Photograph of House. Salem Road 



^" 







Figure 22: Photograph of 144 Princess Anne Road 




^^^aWP'SP^ 



Figure 23: Photograph of 2365 Princess Anne Road 




Figure 24: Photograph of Pungo Grill 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 18 

THEME: EDUCATION 

The county has a long tradition of public education, dating back to the mid 1800s. Due to the 
lack of adequate transportation and the sporadic residential development, one-room schoolhouses 
were used for children of all ages and all incomes. 

In 1900, all 43 of the county's schools were one-room, yet by 1941 just seven remained in the 
county. The 20th century signified the decline of the one-room schoolhouse with the construction 
of a consolidated school in 1908. Plans were adopted to build a five-room school in Oceana, 
replacing schools at Cape Henry, Seatack, Oceana, and Virginia Beach. The new school opened 
in the fall of 1908 and added the county's first high-school level instruction.^ A second high 
school opened at Kempsville in 1910 and a third at Creeds. These three schools served the 
county's white population until the opening of the central Princess Anne High School in 1954. 
Consolidation efforts continued throughout the mid-twentieth century. 

SURVEYED RESOURCES 

Three educational buildings were identified in the Phase II survey: the Pleasant Ridge School 
(134-399), the Old Charity School (134-253), and the Creeds Elementary School (134-371). 

At the turn of the century, the Pleasant Ridge School was part of a two-room school for white 
children. The building stood on Charity Neck Road and was separated and one room was moved 
in 1918 to its present location at 1392 Princess Anne Road. At this point, it became the Pleasant 
Ridge School for black children. It remained in use until 1956 when the students were 
transferred to the new Seaboard Elementary School, since renamed Princess Anne Elementary. 

The Pleasant Ridge School is presently one of only a few remaining one-room schoolhouses 
(Figure 25). Currently the schoolhouse is not in use but the community plans to utilize the 
building after funds are raised for its restoration. The one-story front gable schoolhouse, 
supported on a brick pier foundation, is wood frame structure. Interior detailing includes built-in 
cabinets. 

The school located at Charity Neck Road and Pleasant Ridge Road offered elementary level 
instruction and some "high school" courses in the early 20th century. The hipped roof, wood 
frame weatherboard auditorium, standing in the center of an agricultural field, is the only 
remaining portion of the school facility. The building is currently used for storage (Figure 26). 

The Charity School closed when the present Creeds Elementary School building on Princess 
Anne Road opened in 1939. The initial twelve-classroom building was constructed with the aid of 
Public Works Administration funds. It offered instruction from first grade through high school, 
replacing the old Creeds School south of Moore's Neck Road and Princess Anne Road. The 
school ceased to provide high school level education in 1954, becoming Creeds Elementary 
School. The two-story brick elementary school has ribbon windows with an segmental arched 
entryway (Figure 27). 



'Mansfiled, p. 104. 




Figure 25: Photograph of Pleasant Ridge School 




Figure 26: Photograph of Old Charily School Auditorium 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 19 

THEME: RELIGION 

The most common religious denomination found in the Phase II survey area is Methodist. The 
first Methodist congregation was that of Charity Church, organized in 1789 in the Back Bay area, 
followed by Nimmo Church in 1791.^*^ The third of the Charity Neck Church buildings was 
destroyed by fire in 1941 and has been reconstructed of brick on the same site. 

SURVEYED RESOURCES 

Ten church buildings were identified in the Phase II survey, the oldest of which dates from ca. 
1830. The churches all have open nave plans with a projecting steeple and little or no 
ornamentation. Although a few of the buildings have been altered, several excellent examples of 
vernacular church architecture remain intact. The Nimmo Church (134-696), the Tabernacle 
Methodist Church (134-080), and the Salem United Methodist Church (134-690) illustrate the 
rural church building. Of the ten churches surveyed, six are Methodist, two are Baptist, and two 
are Fellowships. 

The Nimmo Church, located at the crossroads of General Booth Boulevard and Princess Anne 
Road, was founded in 1791 when Anne Nimmo deeded on acre of land for a church building. 
Soon after this a two-story, wood frame weatherboard structure was constructed. During the Civil 
War, the Nimmo Church was occupied as a hospital by the Union Soldiers and eventually 
destroyed by fire. In 1864, the Congregation rebuilt the church on the existing foundation exactly 
as it had appeared. The steeple was added in 1893-1894 and by the 1950s the education wings 
were constructed (Figure 28). For nearly two centuries, the church has been the center of 
community activities as well as religious events. 

The Tabernacle United Methodist Church, located at 1265 Sandbridge Road, was constructed ca. 
1830 (Figure 29). The congregation dates back to 1825, with a circuit-riding preacher who 
traveled to Sandbridge as long ago as 1789. Documentation shows that Tully Whitehurst and the 
Eaton family signed the original deed for the church property in 1825.^^ The two-story open 
nave church, similar in ornament to Nimmo Church, has a projecting hipped roof steeple. The 
lantern of the steeple is pierced by fixed stain glass pointed-arch windows. A side gable addition 
has been added to the rear of the church. 

While the two churches discussed above are example of the predominate vernacular church forms 
found in the southern Virginia Beach area dating from the early to mid- 19th century, the Salem 
United Methodist Church illustrates the church form familiar to the area north of the County 
Court House. Constructed originally ca. 1859 and reconstructed in 1914, the one-and-half-story 
wood frame church has a cross gable roof with a belfry (Figure 30). The church has been 
expanded on the north elevation to provide classrooms and offices. 



"Mansfield, p. 26. 

^^Stiff, Jim. "History from the old Tabernacle book." The Beacon . May 15, 1980. 




Figure 27: Photograph of Creeds Elementar\' School 




Figure 28: Nimmo Church 




Figure 29: Photograph of Tabernacle United Methodist Church 




Figure 30: Photograph of Salem United Methodist Church 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 20 

THEME: COMMERCE AND TRADE 

Historically, the early businesses were generally associated with the farm or agricultural industry 
and consisted of stores and warehouses. However, other commercial enterprises such as taverns 
and small retail stores were located inland along important trade routes, or at small crossroads 
intersections. 

Small Retail Stores 

The most prevalent commercial building still found in Virginia Beach is the small retail store 
located along county roads and at small crossroads communities. Generally dating from the late 
nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, these stores not only provided general 
merchandise to local residents, but served as post offices and small-time loan offices. Three 
nineteenth-and early-twentieth century store buildings were found along Princess Anne Road, and 
include, the Store at 604 Princess Anne Road (134-662), the Store near the North Carolina 
border on Princess Anne Road (134-661), and the Store at 1500 Princess Anne Road (134-288). 

SURVEYED RESOURCES 

One surviving example of the surveyed store buildings, located on Princess Anne Road, is now 
abandoned and deteriorating. The building has a front gable with double wood doors flanked by 
paired windows. A shed roof covered the entry to this commercial concern. 

A larger store, located at the Creeds crossroads, was constructed between 1880 and 1890. The 
one-and-half-story commercial building has a front gable roof with a wrap-around porch. The 
porch has thin round supports with exposed roof rafters. The open interior, although slightly 
altered, remains intact with original cabinets. 

The general store and post office, located at 1500 Princess Anne Road, was constructed in 1935 
at the point where Pleasant Ridge intersects with Princess Anne Road. The 8-course American 
brick bond store originally had a double-story porch supported by brick bases, which still survive. 
The building presently serves as an auto-parts store (Figure 33). 




Figure 31: Photograph of Store. Princess Anne Road 




-■a«52 



\r 



Figure 32: Photograph of Store at Creeds 




Figure 33: Napa Auto Parts Store 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 21 

THEME: RECREATION/ARTS 

Southern Virginia Beach attracted northern sportsmen who would arrive by train or steamer. The 
arrival of the northern sportsmen was welcomed since it provided winter emplojmient for the 
baymen and farmers. Between the 1870s and 1920s over one hundred gunning clubs and lodges 
were established in a one hundred-mile-long area of Back Bay and Currituck Sound and their 
adjoining marshes. ^^ 

Many of the gun clubs constructed modest clubhouses, located a short distance back from the 
march. The area consisted mainly of farms and stretches of trees, owned by the local residents. 
This provided an opportunity for area sportsmen to either lease or purchase small portions of 
land and build clubhouses. Clubhouses were not, however, located near the marsh from which 
the members hunted. Many members hunted on islands or marshes located several miles away 
from the lodges. Several of the smaller public gun clubs remain in operation today, while the 
larger private clubs were dissolved and the property was sold to the Commonwealth of Virginia as 
wildlife preserves.^'' 



SURVEYED RESOURCES 

Numerous hunt club buildings were identified in Phase II, yet due to location on privately 
owned inlets and wildlife preserves maintained by the Commonwealth of Virginia, only two were 
surveyed in this second phase. The oldest known surviving, extant gun clubhouse, the Horn Point 
Club (134-243), was formed in the early 1900 by George Eastman. The Pocohantas Fowling Club 
(134-171), located on twenty acres of high ground and some 890 acres of marsh in the Back Bay 
area, was one of the largest lodges constructed. 

The Horn Point Hunt Club, located at 1809 Horn Point Road, was constructed in ca. 1907. The 
lodge is a two-story building with a flared gambrel roof and flared front gable dormers (Figure 
34). The clubhouse remains much as it did when constructed, with a private caretakers' 
quarters.^** 

The Pocohontas Fowling Club, constructed in the late 1920s, was considered to be the most 
elaborate lodge in the area. It is constructed of wood shingles with a cross hipped roof covered in 
slate tile. The H-shaped lodge, currently a single family residence, had seven bedrooms with 
corner sinks, and a beaded board "Great Room" (Figure 35). The grounds surrounding the lodge 
were landscaped with boxwood lining gravel driveways that exist today. 



^^Johnson, Archie and Bud Coppedge. Gun Clubs and Decoys of Back Bay and Currituck Sound . (Virginia Beach: Johnson and 
Coppedge, 1991), p. 8. 

^ ^Johnson, p. 37. 

^^Johnson, p. 41. 




Figure 34: Photograph of Horn Point Club 




Figure 35: Photograph of Pocohantas Fowling Ciub 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 22 

SECTION IV SURVEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 



A. Summary and Analysis of Survey Findings 

City of Virginia Beach Database Holdings 

The VDHR-Integrated Preservation Software System (IPS) is a computer system developed by 
the National Park Service and customized to meet VDHR's computer needs and desires. VDHR- 
IPS contains an individual database for the Phase II Survey of the City of Virginia Beach. The 
City of Virginia Beach, Phase II Database includes a record for all properties surveyed during this 
phase of the survey. During the 1993 survey by Traceries, a total of 175 properties were surveyed 
and entered into the computer system. Many of these properties contained more that one 
historic resource, all of which are listed in the database; in general, however, only the primary 
resource and those secondary resources with particular architectural or historic merit were 
comprehensively recorded. 

These database holdings, once merged with the database created during the Phase I Survey of the 
City of Virginia Beach, will result in a complete listing of the historic resources in the entire City 
of Virginia Beach. 

Statistical information based upon the Phase II survey findings can be produced by running 
computer-generated reports. Some of this information is factual, and is based upon numbers 
collected from the survey, while other information is evaluative, and is based upon Traceries' 
evaluation of architectural and historical data collected during the survey. The following headings 
represent both factual and evaluative subjects on which computer reports have been generated. 
These reports answer questions about the architecture and reveal important trends about the City 
of Virginia Beach's built environment. The following statistics are based upon a sampling of 
reports; other reports focusing on different issues can be generated from the system. 



National Register Resource Categories 

Each property record listed in the computer includes a count of the number and category of 
National Register resources located on the property. These resource categories are as follows: 
building, structure, district, site, object. The resources were labeled based on the definitions 
included in National Register Bulletin 15 . 

Building A building, such as a house, barn, church, hotel, or similar construction, is 
created to shelter any form of human activity. "Building" may also be used to refer to a 
historically and functionally related unit, such as a courthouse and jail or a house and 
barn. 

District A district possesses a significant concentration, linkage, or continuity or sites, 
buildings, structures, or objects united historically or aesthetically by plan or physical 
development. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 23 

Site A site is the location of a significant event, a prehistoric or historic occupation or 
activity, or a building or structure, whether standing, ruined, or vanished, when the 
location itself possesses historic, cultural, or archeological value regardless of the value of 
any existing structure. 

Structure The term "structure" is used to distinguish from buildings those functional 
constructions made usually for purposes other than creating human shelter. 

Object The term "object" is used to distinguish from buildings and structures those 
constructions that are primarily artistic in nature or are relatively small in scale and simply 
constructed. Although it may be, by nature or design, movable, an object is associated 
with a specific setting or environment, such as statuary in a designed landscape. 

The survey of the City of Virginia Beach was primarily an architectural survey. A total of 279 
buildings were identified, compared with 7 sites, 14 structures, and objects. Of the 279 buildings 
identified, 170 of them were surveyed. 

Environmental Setting 

The physical character of the immediate and general setting of the surveyed properties was 
recorded on site and entered into IPS. Of the 175 properties surveyed, over half, or 97 of them, 
were considered to be located within a farm or agricultural setting, while 46 of them were set 
within a residential yard or development. At least 15 of the historic resources surveyed were 
located along a major transportation corridor, while the remaining properties were found on 
overgrown lots, along the water edge or the like. These findings reveal the still rural nature of 
the survey area with the encroachment of residential communities into the once uniquely 
agricultural land. The 15 historic resources located along major transportation corridors indicates 
that historic roads which were primarily for the moving of agricultural goods and materials have 
now become important corridors that serve the greater community. 

Resource Types 

Each property record includes a count of resource types that are located on the property, whether 
or not they were individually surveyed. For each resource that was individually surveyed, a 
resource record was created and completed. An accurate account of the numbers and types of 
resources identified, as well as those surveyed can be generated in a report format. For instance, 
in this survey of the City of Virginia Beach, 158 dwellings were identified and 148 were surveyed; 
12 churches were identified and 11 churches were surveyed, 3 stores were identified and three 
were surveyed; four kitchens were identified and one was surveyed. Other historic resource types 
identified include, bams, sheds, garages, other outbuildings and other various resources. 
Secondary resources, such as smokehouses and sheds were only individually surveyed if they were 
good examples of the building type or had an early date of construction. Otherwise, they were 
listed in the count and described within the primary resource record. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 24 

Threatened Properties 

Based on the survey findings, 34 of the surveyed resources were determined to be threatened by 
deterioration or location (at least one known resource is threatened by the expansion of Oceana 
Boulevard). Of the 34 threatened resources, 29 were considered threatened by deterioration, 
principally resulting from neglect and/or abandonment. For a list of the threatend properties, see 
Table 2. 

VDHR Themes 

VDHR has defined eighteen cultural themes for Virginia's material cultural history from 
prehistoric times to the present. Each surveyed property relates to one or more of the defined 
themes. The following list shows the historic themes developed for the City of Virginia Beach 
and the number of resources associated with them. 

IPS Frequency Report 

For the field fflSTORIC CONTEXT 



# of Uses 


VDHR Historic Theme 


2 


Commerce/Trade 


140 


Domestic 


3 


Education 


1 


Govemment/Law/Political 


2 


Recreational 


11 


Religion 


15 


Subsistence/Agricultural 



The high count of resources pertaining to the Domestic theme indicates the large number of 
dwellings, smokehouses, kitchens and other examples of domestic architecture that were identified 
during the survey. 

Fifteen uses of the Subsistence/Agriculture theme reveals that, despite the changing rural nature 
of the area, farming is still practiced on historic farms and survives as a local industry. The 
Recreation theme relates to the two hunt clubs which were surveyed. Because the City of 
Virginia Beach is surrounded by water, it is not surprising that hunting was an important historic 
recreational activity. 

National Register Extended Criteria 

Nine properties and their corresponding resources were determined potentially eligible for listing 
on the National Register. This determination was based upon on-site survey and archival research 
findings, as well as review of the integrity of the resource. Extended criteria, developed by 
Traceries, but tied to the National Register of Historic Places Criteria, provides a more specific 
explanation for the properties' potential for significance. This information represents a 



VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
IPS-Generated Report 

Threatened Resour'ces and Types of Threat 

VDHR File # Address 



05/27/1993 



Type of Threat 
to Resource 



134-0062- 


1569 


134-0101- 


101 


134-0169- 


129 


134-0179- 


1540 


134-0188- 




134-0212- 




134-0220- 




134-0246- 


1328 


134-0247- 


1448 


134-0278- 




134-0279- 


1585 


134-0289- 




134-0305- 


700 


134-0308- 


2245 


134-0337- 


5420 


134-0347- 


2300 


134-0351- 


3173 


134-0354- 


3413 


134-0364- 


756 


134-0392- 


1255 


134-0399- 


1392 


134-0550- 


1533 


134-0661- 




134-0667- 




134-0672- 




134-0680- 


1997 


134-0686- 




134-0691- 


1846 


134-0692- 




134-0703- 


2285 


134-0707- 


4153 


134-0710- 




134-0711- 




134-0723- 


3300 



Princess Anne Road 
London Bridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Back Bay Landing Road 
Fitztown Road 
Navmey ' s creek Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
Drum Point Road 
North Muddy creek Rd. 
North Muddy creek Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Old Pungo Ferry Road 
Blackwater Road 
Vaughan Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Salem Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Muddy Creek Road 

Indian River Road 

Princess Anne Road 

North Muddy creek Road 

Salem Road 

Salem Road 

London Bridge Road 

Indian River Raod 

West Neck Road 

Knott's Island Road 

Harlie Court 



Deterioration 

Road Expansion 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Vacant 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Location 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

other 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Location 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Deterioration 

Location 



34 RECORDS IN THIS REPORT 

TABLE 2: THREATENED RESOURCES AND TYPES OF THREAT 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 25 

preliminary review of the properties; additional archival research and analysis is required. In 
addition, the determination represents Traceries' professional opinions and must be reviewed by 
the VDHR staff, and the State Review Board, before the formal designation process is pursued 
by the county or individual land owners. For a list of the nine properties determined potentially 
eligible, see Table 3. 

B. Recommendations for Further Study 

Compilation of On-Site Survey Findings and Review of IPS 

Because the survey of the City of Virginia Beach was conducted in two phases by two separate 
consultants, the findings from the individual studies have not been merged. While the initial 
phase of the survey was conducted in the northern part of the City of Virginia Beach by Frazier 
Associates, the second phase concentrated on the southern half of the former county and was 
conducted by Traceries. The findings from both surveys should be listed on a single IPS database 
and existing records and computer entries should be reviewed for errors, omissions and 
consistency. IPS has been reorganized since it was first developed; the Phase 2 Survey used a 
September 1992 version of the software that lacked data elements needed to provide required 
data/and or the ability to run certain reports. VDHR is correcting the software application and 
this corrected version (which should be available during the fall of 1993) should be used for the 
merging process. The review and update of IPS will result in a complete and accurate listing of 
all the historic resources surveyed in the City of Virginia Beach and will be a useful tool in future 
evaluations of properties. 

Archival Research 

Conduct Primary Resource Research: Although Traceries conducted general research on the 
history of the area as well as limited research on certain individual sites, systematic primary 
research was not a component of this survey. It is recommended that further research be 
conducted on certain historic properties, especially those determined potentially eligible to the 
National Register. This research will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the history 
of the City's individual resources. This research will furthermore provide the necessary 
information to completely evaluate the buildings' significance at the local, state and national 
levels. 

This type of work was conducted on three of the properties that were determined potentially 
eligible to the National Register. Along with the on-site findings, this information was compiled 
onto a Preliminary Information Form and should be submitted to the Virginia Department of 
Historic Resources for review. If the VDHR determines that the properties do appear eligible 
based upon this review, the formal designation process should be pursued. 

Preservation Plan 

Virginia Beach has now completed a two-phased comprehensive survey of its historic resources. 
To move toward protecting these identified resources, it is appropriate for the City to pursue the 
development of a preservation plan. A critical first step in this process involves the reconciliation 



VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 05/27/1993 

PROPERTIES WITH NATIONAL REGISTER POTENTIAL 

VDHR File # Name of Property Ptl Applicable NR Criteria 

134-0006- Brown's Tavern C05 Illustrates building types and 

sub- types . 
C06 Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 

C06 Illustrates influential,, rare, 
notable architectural style. 

COS Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 

BOl Residence of persons significant to 
past. 

COS Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 

COS Illustrates building types and 
sub- types. 

COS Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 



134-0011- Ferry Farm 



134-0038- Woodhouse, Johnathan 
House 



134-0072- Lovett, Lancaster House 
134-0171- Pocahantas Hunt Club 



134-0320- Farm, 2968 Indian Creek 
Road 



134-0351- Baxter (Frost) Farm, 3173 C05 Illustrates building types and 



134-0362- 



Land of Promise Road 



Gresham Farm 



134-0723- Murry, Isaac House 
9 RECORDS IN THIS REPORT 



sub- types . 
A02 Illustrates development of building 

type. 
C06 Illustrates influential, rare, 

notable architectural style. 
A05 Reflects attitudes on societal 

structure. 

C06 Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 

BOl Residence of persons significant to 
past. 

C06 Illustrates influential, rare, 
notable architectural style. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 26 

of the two phases of the survey into a single document and the preparation of a single map 
locating all of the identified resources. 

A preservation plan will provide the information and process necessary for the City to determine 
the appropriate level of protection for its historic resources. In addition, this plan will provide the 
methods of implementation to make this protection a reality. 

C. Evaluation/Recommendation for Designation 

Standards for Evaluation: 

The evaluation of the historic resources of the City of Virginia Beach was conducted using the 
National Register of Historic Places criteria. The National Register Criteria for Evaluation, 
developed by the National Park Service, are standards by which every property that is nominated 
to the National Register is judged. The National Register of Historic Places is the official 
national list of recognized properties, and is maintained and expanded by the National Park 
Service on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior. 
The National Register of Historic Places Criteria states: 

The quahty of significance in American history, architecture, archeology, and culture is 
present in districts, sites, buildings, and objects that possess integrity of location, design, 
setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association, and: 

A that are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad 
patterns of our history; or 

B. that are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or 

C. that embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction or 
that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a 
significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction; or 

D. that have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 27 

Recommendations for Designation of Historic Properties to the National Register of Historic 
Places: 

Based upon the survey work conducted in the southern half of the City of Virginia Beach, 
Traceries identified nine properties as being potentially eligible to the National Register. This is 
a preliminary review, however, and each of the listed properties requires further research before a 
determination of eligibility can be made. The nine identified resources are listed below: 

Ferry Farm (134-11) 

Associated VDHR Theme(s): Domestic 



Criterion C: Built between 1790-1820, Ferry Farm is a large, two-story brick dwelling 

designed in the Federal style of architecture. Although the original setting has 
been compromised and the building now sits in the center of a residential 
subdivision, the house survives as one of a few Federal style houses in this area 
of the City. 



Brown's Tavern (134-06)) 

Associated VDHR TTieme(s): Domestic; Commerce/Trade 

Criterion C: Located on the historically important north-south corridor through the former 
county. Brown's Tavern was used during the 19th century as an inn, or tavern. 
The house is not only noted for its one-time building use, but for its style. The 
house, built ca. 1832, is designed in an elegant transitional Federal and 
Italianate style. 

Jonathan Woodhouse House (134-38) 

Associated VDHR Themes(s): Domestic 

Criterion B: The Woodhouse House was built by the locally prominent Woodhouse family 
and occupied by them for several generations. 

Criterion C: Built ca. 1760, the Woodhouse house survives as one of the oldest buildings in 
the survey area. The 1-1/2-story brick dwelling features a distinctive gambrel 
roof with shed roof dormers and is a fine example of vernacular domestic 
architecture from this period. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 28 

Thomas Lovett House (134-72) 

Associated VDHR Themes(s): Domestic 

Criterion C: Like the Woodhouse House, the Lovett House is one of the oldest buildings 
remaining in this part of the City. Built ca. 1772, the house is a 1-1/2-story 
frame structure covered with a distinctive gambrel roof. 

Pocohantas Hunt Club (134-171) 

Associated VDHR Themes(s): Recreation 

Criterion C: Built in 1926, the Pocohantas Hunt Club is an excellent example of a 

substantial hunt club building that has historically dotted the shores of this 
area. 

Farm, Indian Creek Road (134-320) 

Associated VDHR Themes(s): Subsistence/Agricultural 

Criterion C: This farmhouse on Indian Creek Road stands as a good example of a mid-19th 
century side-passage-plan dwelling. The farm complex includes barns and 
other agricultural buildings from the early 20th century. 

Baxter House (134-351) 

Associated VDHR Themes(s): Domestic 

Criterion C: The Baxter House is the most substantial and intact example of a Federal-style 
farmhouse in the southern part of the City of Virginia Beach. The house, built 
1780-1820, retains most of its interior details, including wainscotting, Federal 
mantels, door and window trim and other moldings. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 29 

Gresham (Ives) House (134-362) 

Associated VDHR Theme(s): Domestic 

Criterion A: Lx)cal tradition holds that the Ives House was the site of some military activity 
during the Civil War. 

Criterion B: The Ives House has been the residence of the locally established Ives family 
since the late 19th century. 

Criterion C: The Ives House is a good example of a mid-19th century farmhouse having a 
two-story, three-bay, side-passage plan. 



Isaac Murry House (134-723) 

Associated VDHR Theme(s): Domestic 

Criterion C: The Murry House survives as one of the few remaining houses in the area 
from the 18th century. Built ca. 1786, the Murry House is similar in form to 
the Woodhouse House and Lovett House. 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 30 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Published and Unpublished Resources 



Brown, Edgar. Unpublished collection of photographs and information for selected houses in 
Princess Anne County. Lent to Traceries, March 1993, for the purpose of this survey. 

Coppedge, Bud and Archie Johnson. Gun Clubs & Decoy of Back Bay and Currituck Sound . 
Virginia Beach, Virginia: CurBac Press, 1991. 

Eighmey, Kathleen M. The Beach: A History of Virginia Beach. Virginia . Virginia Beach, 
Virginia: Department of Public Libraries, City of Virginia Beach, 1976. 

Jordan, James M. IV and Frederick S. Jordan. Virginia Beach: A Pictorial History . Richmond, 
Virginia: Hale Publishing, 1974. 

Kellam, Sadie Scott and V. Hope Kellam. Old Houses in Princess Anne Virginia . Portsmouth, 
Virginia: Printcraft Press, Inc., 1931 

Mansfield, Stephen S. Princess Anne County and Virginia Beach: A Pictorial History . Virginia 
Beach, Virginia: The Donning Company/Publishers, 1989. 

Phase I Cultural Resource Survey of the Proposed Build Alternatives for the Southeastern 
Expressway, Cities of Virginia Beach and Virginia Beach, Virginia . Williamsburg, Virginia: 
MAAR Associates, Inc., 1989. 

Reconnaissance Architectural Survey Report. City of Virginia Beach . Staunton: Frazier 
Associates, 1992. 

Taylor, Sue. City of Virginia Beach Inventory of Historic Buildings and Sites . Virginia Beach: 
The Office of Research and Strategic Analysis, 1990. 

Tazewell, C. W., ed. Meet Marshall Parks: Founder of Virginia Beach . Virginia Beach, Virginia: 
W. S. Dawson, Co., 1984 



Historic Resources Survey Report of the City of Virginia Beach 
May 1993 
TRACERIES/Page 31 

Maps 

English Army Engineers. Princess Anne County . 1781. 

Ewald Diary. James' Plantation in Princess Anne County . Plan of the skirmish with the rebels at 
James' Plantation in Princess Anne County. ND. 

Latham, William. Virginia and North Carolina ("Virginia PaneH . 1807. 

Nimmo, James. Plat of land of Newtown . 1741. 

Taylor, Robert. Map of the Country Contiguous to Norfolk . 1840 



APPENDIX A 



Page No. 1 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 5/27/19 
VA Beach Report by ID Nvunber of Property 

VDHR File # Year Built Address USGS Quad Map 



134-0003- 


1810 


ca 


805 


134-0006- 


1830- 


-1850 


2176 


134-0011- 


1790- 


-1820 




134-0029- 


1824 




2408 


134-0038- 


1760 




2380 


134-0040- 


1880- 


-1900 


1620 


134-0043- 


1794 




2565 


134-0044- 


1860- 


-1890 


1660 


134-0057- 


1772- 


-1765 


1489 


134-0059- 


1839- 


-1859 


2061 


134-0062- 


1888 




1569 


134-0069- 


1880- 


-1910 


2380 


134-0070- 


1880- 


-1910 


2368 


134-0072- 


1772 






134-0080- 


1830 




1265 


134-0101- 


1920- 


■1940 


101 


134-0115- 


1840- 


-1880 


572 


134-0151- 


1885 


ca 




134-0169- 


1880- 


-1910 


129 


134-0170- 


1890- 


-1910 


256 


134-0171- 


1926- 


■1931 


6216 


134-0172- 


1890- 


-1910 


1400 


134-0173- 


1867 




268 


134-0174- 


1880 


ca 


1956 


134-0175- 


1900- 


-1920 


2121 


134-0176- 


1880- 


-1910 


448 


134-0179- 


1880- 


■1900 


1540 


134-0181- 


1880- 


-1910 


480 



Oceana Boulevard 
Oceana Boulevard 
Cheswick Land 
North Landing Road 
London Bridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Seaboard Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Pleasant Ridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Holland Road 
Sandbridge Road 
London Bridge Road 
Oceana Blvd 
Holland Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Pochahantas Club Road 
Public Landing Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Munden Point Road 
Munden Point Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Back Bay Landing Road 
Princess Anne Road 



Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Kempsville 
Kempsville 
Princess Anne 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
North Bay 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 
Creeds 



Page No. 2 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
VA Beach Report by ID Number 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/27/1993 



USGS Quad Map 



134-0183- 


1880- 


-1910 


5980 


Fitztown Road 


Creeds 


134-0184- 


1920- 


-1930 


5891 


Fitztown Road 


Creeds 


134-0186- 


1880- 


-1900 


5657 


Fitztown Road 


creeds 


134-0188- 


1890- 


-1910 




Fitztown Road 


Creeds 


134-0189- 


1880- 


-1990 


512 


Princess Anne Road 


Creeds 


134-0190- 


1890- 


-1910 


550 


Princess Anne Road 


Creeds 


134-0196- 


1880- 


-1910 




Munden Road 


Creeds 


134-0197- 


1880- 


-1910 


1369 


Munden Road 


Creeds 


134-0198- 


1888 




5033 


Morris Neck Road 


Pleasant Ridge 


134-0199- 


1880- 


-1910 


4960 


Morris Neck Road 


Pleasant Ridge 


134-0205- 


1880- 


-1910 


1641 


Mill Landing Road 


Pleasant Ridge 


134-0208- 


1880- 


-1910 


1680 


Mill Landing Road 


Pleasant Ridge 


134-0212- 


1880- 


-1910 




Nawney's Creek Road 


Pleasant Ridge 


134-0218- 


1880- 


-1890 


1409 


Drum Point Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0220- 


1880- 


-1900 




Muddy Creek Road 


North 


Bay 


134-229- 


1880- 


-1910 


4048 


Muddy Creek Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0231- 


1870- 


-1900 


2980 


North Muddy Creek Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0243- 


1920- 


-1940 


1809 


Horn Point Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0246- 


1870- 


-1880 


1328 


North Muddy Creek Rd. 


North 


Bay 


134-0247- 


1860- 


-1880 


1448 


North Muddy Creek Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0248- 


1860- 


-1880 


3312 


Charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0249- 


1890- 


-1920 


3360 


charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0251- 


1880- 


-1910 


3434 


Charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0253- 


1910- 


-1925 




Pleasant Ridge Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0254- 


1880- 


• 1910 


3820 


Charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0255- 


1880- 


■ 1910 


3864 


charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0257- 


1880- 


•1910 


3936 


charity Neck Road 


North 


Bay 


134-0261- 


1890- 


•1910 


1377 


Princess Anne Road 


Pleasant Ridge 



Page No. 3 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
VA Beach Report by ID Number 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/27/1993 



USGS Quad Map 



134-0263- 


1920-1940 


4080 


Charity Neck Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0272- 


1860-1880 


1501 


Gum Bridge Road 


North Bay 


134-0276- 


1886 


1833 


Gum Bridge Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0278- 


1880-1900 




Princess Anne Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0279- 


1880-1910 


1585 


Princess Anne Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0280- 


1880-1910 


3980 


Dawley Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0282- 


1880-1910 


1512 


Pleasant Ridge Road 


North Bay 


134-0288- 


1935 


1500 


Princess Anne Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0289- 


1880-1910 




Princess Anne Road 


creeds 




134-0290- 


1860-1880 


643 


Princess Anne Road 


creeds 




134-0291- 


1880-1900 


609 


Princess Anne Road 


Creeds 




134-0294- 


1890-1910 


636 


Princess Anne Rd 


Creeds 




134-0302- 


1910-1917 


684 


Princess Anne Road 


Creeds 




134-0305- 


1880-1910 


700 


Princess Anne Road 


Creeds 




134-0308- 


1880-1910 


2245 


Old Pungo Ferry Road 


Creeds 




134-0310- 


1880-1910 


5679 


Blackwater Road 


Creeds 




134-0316- 


1880-1900 


5853 


Blackwater Road 


Creeds 




134-0319- 


1890-1919 


6000 


Blackwater Road 


Creeds 




134-0320- 


1830-1860 


2968 


Indian Creek Road 


Creeds 




134-0324- 


1880-1900 


6269 


crags causeway 


Creeds 




134-0325- 


1880-1910 


328 


Baum Road 


Creeds 




134-0333- 


1880-1910 


2761 


west Gibbs Road 


Creeds 




134-0334- 


1880-1910 


3001 


Head River Road 


Creeds 




134-0337- 


1880-1910 


5420 


Blackwater Road 


Creeds 




134-0347- 


1880-1910 


2300 


Vaughan Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0349- 


1840-1880 


3141 


Land of Promise Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0350- 


1880-1910 


3194 


Land of Promise Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 


134-0351- 


1790-1820 


3173 


Land of Promise Road 


Pleasant 


Ridge 



Page No. 4 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 05/27/1993 

VA Beach Report by ID Number 

VDHR File # Year Built Address USGS Quad Map 



134- 


-0352- 


1880- 


-1910 


3192 


134- 


-0354- 


1880- 


-1890 


3413 


134- 


-0358- 


1860- 


-1880 


4605 


134- 


-0359- 


1860- 


-1880 


4490 


134- 


-0361- 


1915- 


-1925 


4253 


134- 


-0362- 


1820- 


-1860 


4152 


134- 


-0364- 


1880- 


-1910 


756 


134- 


-0365- 


1880- 


-1910 


765 


134- 


-0367- 


1835- 


-1860 


773 


134- 


-0371- 


1939 






134- 


-0372- 


1870- 


-1890 




134- 


-0382- 


1924 




2216 


134- 


-0385- 


1900- 


-1920 


1123 


134- 


-0387- 


1880- 


-1910 


1161 


134- 


-0390- 


1880- 


-1910 


1241 


134- 


-0392- 


1860- 


-1880 


1255 


134- 


-0393- 


1880- 


-1910 


1258 


134- 


-0394- 


1920- 


-1940 


2009 


134- 


-0395- 


1880- 


-1910 


2200 


134- 


-0396- 


1870- 


-1890 


2254 


134- 


-0398- 


1880- 


-1910 


1325 


134- 


-0399- 


1880- 


-1890 


1392 


134- 


-0404- 


1894 




1464 


134- 


-0408- 


1894 




1504 


134- 


-0524- 


1900- 


-1920 


2077 


134- 


-0525- 


1880- 


-1910 


2016 


134- 


-0550- 


1880- 


-1900 


1533 


134- 


-0661- 


1910- 


■ 1920 





Land of Promise Road 
Land of Promise Road 
Blackwater Road 
Blackwater Road 
Blackwater Road 
Blackwater Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
South Stowe Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Vaughan Road 
Vaughan Road 
Vaughan Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Salem Road 
Princess Anne Road 



Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Kempsville 
Creeds 



Page No. 5 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
VA Beach Report by ID Number 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/27/1993 



USGS Quad Map 



134- 


-0662- 


1880- 


-1890 


604 


134- 


-0663- 


1875 




465 


134- 


-0664- 


1900- 


-1920 


5677 


134- 


-0665- 


1880- 


-1910 


749 


134- 


-0666- 


1919 




1785 


134- 


-0667- 


1880- 


-1910 




134- 


-0668- 


1880- 


-1910 


1185 


134- 


-0669- 


1880- 


-1910 


1076 


134- 


-0670- 


1880- 


-1910 


1309 


134- 


-0671- 


1880- 


-1910 


1921 


134- 


-0672- 


1880- 


-1900 




134- 


-0673- 


1880- 


-1900 


1560 


134- 


-0674- 


1920- 


-1940 




134- 


-0675- 


1870- 


■ 1890 


1549 


134- 


-0676- 


1920- 


■1940 


2197 


134- 


-0677- 


1880- 


-1910 


1416 


134- 


-0679- 


1920- 


-1940 




134- 


-0680- 


1880- 


-1910 


1997 


134- 


-0681- 


1880- 


-1910 


1980 


134- 


-0682- 


1890- 


■1920 


1868 


134- 


■0683- 


1880- 


-1900 


1817 


134- 


-0684- 


1880- 


■1900 


1724 


134- 


-0685- 


1860- 


■1870 


1791 


134- 


-0686- 


1880- 


■1900 




134- 


-0687- 


1880- 


■1910 


3045 


134- 


-0688- 


1850- 


■1910 


3004 


134- 


■0689- 


1880- 


■1910 


2324 


134- 


■0690- 


1859 




2048 



Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Morris Neck Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
sandbridge Road 
Sandbridge Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Indian River Road 
Indian River Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
Attwoodtown Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
North Muddy Creek Road 
Seaboard Road 
Seaboard Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Salem Road 



Creeds 
creeds 
creeds 
Creeds 

Pleasant Ridge 
North Bay 
North Bay 
North Bay 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
North Bay 
North Bay 
North Bay 
North Bay 
Pleasant Ridge 
Princess Anne 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 



Page No. 6 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
VA Beach Report by ID Number 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/27/1993 



USGS Quad Map 



134-0691- 


1880- 


-1910 


1846 


134-0692- 


1880- 


-1910 




134-0693- 


1880- 


-1910 


1772 


134-0694- 


1860- 


-1880 


1685 


134-0695- 


1850- 


-1880 


2384 


134-0696- 


1864 




2200 


134-0697- 


1880- 


-1910 


2545 


134-0698- 


1890- 


-1910 


3485 


134-0699- 


1880- 


-1910 




134-0700- 


1880- 


-1910 


3000 


134-0701- 


1920- 


-1940 


2960 


134-0702- 


1880- 


-1910 




134-0703- 


1860- 


-1880 


2285 


134-0704- 


1880- 


-1910 


828 


134-0705- 


1910- 


■ 1920 


890 


134-0706- 


1861 


ca 


4488 


134-0707- 


1880- 


-1910 


4153 


134-0708- 


1900- 


-1920 


2220 


134-0709- 


1920- 


-1940 


2365 


134-0710- 


1900- 


-1920 




134-0711- 


1860- 


-1890 




134-0712- 


1920- 


-1940 


100 


134-0713- 


1920- 


-1940 


144 


134-0714- 


1900- 


-1920 


2303 


134-0715- 


1880- 


-1910 


2552 


134-0716- 


1880- 


-1910 




134-0717- 


1880- 


-1910 


2004 


134-0718- 


1880- 


-1910 


1053 



Salem Road 
Salem Road 
Salem Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
West Landing Road 
West Neck Road 
West Neck Road 
West Landing Road 
West Neck Road 
Holland Road 
London Bridge Road 
Dwyer Road 
Old Dam Neck Road 
Indian River Road 
Indian River Raod 
Indian River Road 
Princess Anne Road 
West Neck Road 
Knott's Island Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
West Landing Road 
West Neck Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 



Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Princess Anne 
Princess Anne 
Virginia Beach 
Virginia Beach 
Kempsville 
Kempsville 
Pleasant Ridge 
Princess Anne 
Pleasant Ridge 
Knott's Island 
Creeds 
Creeds 

Princess Anne 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasant Ridge 



Page No. 7 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 05/27/1993 

VA Beach Report by ID Number 

VDHR File # Year Built Address USGS Quad Map 



134-0719- 1903-1910 4600 Old Princess Anne Road 

134-0720- 1880-1910 3877 Charity Neck Road 

134-0721- 1880-1910 5857 Providence Road 

134-0722- 1880-1910 1805 Kempsville Road 

134-0723- 1786 3300 Harlie Court 

134-0724- 1920-1940 Providence Road 

134-0725- 1920-1940 4384 Charity Neck Road 



Kempsville 
Pleasant Ridge 
Kempsville 
Virginia Beach 
Kempsville 
Kempsville 
North Bay 



175 RECORDS IN THIS REPORT 



APPENDIX B 



Page No. 1 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134-0057- Anthony Fentress House 

134-0181- Atkiss House 

134-0351- Baxter (Frost) Farm 

134-0172- Bay Haven Farm 

134-0716- Beech Grove United Methodist Church 

134-0003- Bell House, 805 Oceana Blvd. 
Cedar Grove 

134-0663- Bethel United Methodist Church 

134-0319- Blackwater Baptist Church 

134-0006- Brown's Tavern 

Morrisette, Anna House 

134-0170- Caffee Estate 

134-0263- Charity Methodist Church 

134-0371- Creeds Elementary school 

134-0721- Davis Farm 

134-0382- Dudley Farm 

134-0694- Farm, 1685 North Muddy Creek Road 

134-0684- Farm, 1724 Princess Anne Road 

134-0682- Farm, 1868 Princess Anne Road 

134-0320- Farm, 2968 Indian Creek Road 

134-0688- Farm, 3004 Seaboard Road 

134-0310- Farm, 5679 Blackwater Road 

134-0665- Farm, 749 Princess Anne Road 

134-0367- Farm, 773 Princess Anne Road 

134-0212- Farm, Nawney's Creek Road 

134-0011- Ferry Farm 

134-0062- Fisher House 

134-0183- Freeman House 

134-0199- Gibbs House 

134-0362- Gresham Farm 



1489 Princess Anne Road 
4 80 Princess Anne Road 

3173 Land of Promise 
1400 Public Landing Road 

West Neck Road 
805 Oceana Boulevard 

465 Princess Anne Road 

6 000 Blackwater Road 
2176 Oceana Boulevard 

2 56 Princess Anne Road 
4 80 Charity Neck Road 

Princess Anne Road 

5857 Providence Road 

2216 Stowe Road 

16 85 Muddy Creek Road 

1724 Princess Anne Road 

1868 Princess Anne Road 

2968 Indian Creek Road 

3 004 Seaboard Road 
567 9 Blackwater Road 
749 Princess Anne Road 

7 73 Princess Anne Road 

Nawney ' s Creek Road 

Cheswick Lane 
1569 Princess Anne Road 
59 8 Fitztown Road 
496 Morris Neck Road 
4152 Blackwater Road 



Ives Farm 

134-0169- Helms Place 

134-0392- Heritage Plantation 

134-0243- Horn Point Hunt Club 

134-0712- House, 100 Princess Anne Road 

134-0101- House, 101 London Bridge Road 

134-0718- House, 1053 Princess Anne Road 

134-0669- House, 1076 Sandbridge Road 

134-0385- House, 1123 Princess Anne Road 

134-0387- House, 1161 Princess Anne Road 

134-0668- House, 1185 Sandbridge Road 

134-0390- House, 1241 Princess Anne Road 

134-0393- House, 1258 Princess Anne Road 

134-0670- House, 1309 Princess Anne Road 

134-0398- House, 1325 Princess Anne 

134-0197- House, 1369 Munden Road 

134-0677- House, 1416 Princess Anne Road 

134-0713- House, 144 Princess Anne Road 

134-0247- House, 1448 North Muddy Creek Road 

134-0404- House, 1464 Princess Anne Road 

134-0272- House, 1501 Gum Bridge Road 

134-0408- House, 1504 Princess Anne Road 

134-0282- House, 1512 Pleasant Ridge Road 

134-0550- House, 1533 Salem Road 

134-0179- House, 1540 Back Bay Landing Road 

134-0675- House, 1549 North Muddy Creek Road 

134-0673- House, 1560 North Muddy Creek Road 

134-0279- House, 1585 Princess Anne Road 

134-0040- House, 1620 Princess Anne Road 

134-0208- House, 1680 Mill Landing Road 

134-0693- House, 1772 Salem Road 

134-0685- House, 1791 Princess Anne Road 



129 Princess Anne Road 

1255 Princess Anne Road 

1809 Horn Point Road 

100 Princess Anne Road 

101 London Bridge Road 
1053 Princess Anne Road 
1076 Sandbridge Road 
1123 Princess Anne Road 
1161 Princess Anne Road 
1185 Sandbridge Road 

12 41 Princess Anne Road 

1258 Princess Anne Road 

1309 Princess Anne Road 

1325 Princess Anne Road 

136 9 Munden Road 

1416 Princess Anne Road 

144 Princess Anne Road 

1448 North Muddy creek 

1464 Princess Anne Road 

1501 Gum Bridge Road 

1504 Princess Anne Road 

1512 Pleasant Ridge Road 

1533 Salem Road 

1540 Back Bay Landing Road 

1549 North Muddy Creek Road 

156 North Muddy Creek Road 

1585 Princess Anne Road 

162 Princess Anne Road' 

16 8 Mill Landing Road 
1772 Salem Road 

17 91 Princess Anne Road 



Page No. 3 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of Surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134- 


-0683- 


House, 


134- 


-0691- 


House, 


134- 


-0671- 


House, 


134- 


-0174- 


House, 


134- 


-0681- 


House, 


134- 


-0680- 


House, 


134- 


-0717- 


House, 


134- 


-0394- 


House, 


134- 


-0525- 


House, 


134- 


-0524- 


House, 


134- 


-0175- 


House, 


134- 


-0676- 


House, 


134- 


-0395- 


House, 


134- 


-0396- 


House, 


134- 


-0703- 


House, 


134- 


■0347- 


House, 


134- 


-0714- 


House, 


134- 


-0689- 


House, 


134- 


■0709- 


House, 


134- 


-0695- 


House, 


134- 


-0697- 


House, 


134- 


-0715- 


House, 


134- 


-0333- 


House, 


134- 


-0701- 


House, 


134- 


-0231- 


House, 


134- 


-0700- 


House, 


134- 


-0334- 


House, 


134- 


-0687- 


House, 


134- 


-0349- 


House, 



1817 Princess Anne Road 

1846 Salem Road 

1921 Indian River Road 

1956 Munden Point Road 

19 80 Princess Anne Road 

1997 Princess Anne Road 

2004 Princess Anne Road 

2009 Vaughan Road 

2016 Princess Anne Road 

2077 Princess Anne Road 

2121 Munden Point Road 

2197 Attwoodtown Road 

2200 Vaughan Road 

2254 Vaughan Road 

2285 London Bridge Road 

2300 Vaughan Road 

2303 Princess Anne Road 

2324 Princess Anne Road 

2365 Princess Anne Road 

2384 Princess Anne Road 

2545 West Landing Road 

2552 West Landing Road 

2761 Gibbs Road 

2960 West Neck Road 

29 80 North Muddy Creek Road 

3000 West Neck Road 

3001 Head River Road 
3045 Seaboard Road 

3141 Land of Promise Road 



1817 Princess Anne Road 

1846 Salem Road 

1921 Indian River Road 

1956 Munden Point Road 

1980 Princess Anne Road 

19 97 Princess Anne Road 

2 04 Princess Anne Road 

2 009 Vaughan Road 

2016 Princess Anne Road 

2077 Princess Anne Road 

2121 Munden Point Road 

2197 Attwoodtown Road 

22 00 Vaughan Road 

22 54 vaughan Road 

2285 London Bridge Road 

2300 Vaughan Road 

2303 Princess Anne Road 

232 4 Princess Anne Road 

2365 Princess Anne Road 

2384 Princess Anne Road 

254 5 West Landing Road 

2552 West Landing Road 

2761 West Gibbs Road 

296 West Neck Road 

2 9 80 North Muddy Creek Road 
30 West Landing Road 
3001 Head River Road 

3 045 Seaboard Road 

3141 Land of Promise Road 



Page No. 4 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134- 


-0352- 


House, 


134- 


-0350- 


House, 


134- 


-0325- 


House, 


134- 


-0249- 


House, 


134- 


-0354- 


House, 


134- 


-0251- 


House, 


134- 


-0698- 


House, 


134- 


-0254- 


House, 


134- 


-0720- 


House, 


134- 


-0257- 


House, 


134- 


-0280- 


House, 


134- 


-0229- 


House, 


134- 


-0707- 


House, 


134- 


-0361- 


House, 


134- 


-0725- 


House, 


134- 


-0176- 


House, 


134- 


-0706- 


House, 


134-0358- 
Tebault 


House, 


134- 


-0198- 


House, 


134- 


-0189- 


House, 


134- 


-0337- 


House, 


134- 


-0186- 


House, 


134- 


-0664- 


House, 


134- 


-0115- 


House, 


134- 


-0316- 


House, 


134- 


-0184- 


House, 


134- 


-0291- 


House, 


134- 


-0294- 


House, 



3192 Land of Promise Road 
3194 Land of Promise Road 
328 Baum Road 
3360 Charity Neck Road 
3413 Land of Promise Road 
3434 Charity Neck Road 
3485 West Neck Road 
3820 Charity Neck Road 
3877 Charity Neck Road 
3936 Charity Neck Road 
3980 Dawley Road 
404 8 Muddy Creek Road 
4153 Indian River Road 
4253 Blackwater Road 
4384 Charity Neck Road 
448 Princess Anne Road 
44 88 Indian River Road 
46 05 Blackwater Road 

5033 Morris Neck Road 
512 Princess Anne Road 
5420 Blackwater Road 
5657 Fitztown Road 
5677 Morris Neck Road 
572 Oceana Blvd 
5853 Blackwater Road 
59 81 Fitztown Road 
6 09 Princess Anne Road 
636 Princess Anne Rd 



3192 Land of Promise Road 

3194 Land of Promise Road 

32 8 Baum Road 

3360 Charity Neck Road 

3413 Land of Promise Road 

3434 Charity Neck Road 

3485 West Neck Road 

3 820 Charity Neck Road 
3877 Charity Neck Road 
3936 Charity Neck Road 
398 Dawley Road 

4 04 8 Muddy Creek Road 
4153 Indian River Raod 
4253 Blackwater Road 
4384 Charity Neck Road 
44 8 Princess Anne Road 
4488 Indian River Road 
4605 Blackwater Road 

5033 Morris Neck Road 

512 Princess Anne Road 

542 Blackwater Road 

56 57 Fitztown Road 

5677 Morris Neck Road 

572 Oceana Blvd 

5 853 Blackwater Road 
5891 Fitztown Road 

609 Princess Anne Road 

636 Princess Anne Rd 



Page No. 5 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of Surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134-0302- 
134-0364- 
134-0365- 
134-0704- 
134-0705- 
134-0188- 
134-0672- 
134-0711- 
134-0220- 
134-0667- 
134-0196- 
134-0674- 
134-0686- 
134-0308- 
134-0372- 
134-0289- 
134-0278- 
134-0692- 
134-0699- 
134-0710- 
134-0059- 
134-0359- 
134-0290- 
134-0043- 
134-0072- 

134-0261- 
134-0723- 



House, 684 Princess Anne Road 

House, 756 Princess Anne Road 

House, 765 Princess Anne Road 

House, 828 Dwyer Road 

House, 890 Old Dam Neck Road 

House, Fitztown Road 

House, Indian River Road 

House, Knott's Island Road 

House, Muddy Creek Road 

House, Muddy Creek Road 

House, Munden Road 

House, North Muddy Creek Road 

House, North Muddy Creek Road 

House, Old Pungo Ferry Road 

House, Princess Anne Road 

House, Princess Anne Road 

House, Princess Anne Road 

House, Salem Road 

House, West Neck Road 

House, West Neck Road 

James House 

Jendrick Farm, 44 9 Blackwater Road 

Jim Bright Farms 

Jonathan Fentress House 

Lovett, Lancaster House 

Lovett, Thomas House 

Munden Farm 

Murry, Isaac House 



684 Princess Anne Road 
756 Princess Anne Road 
765 Princess Anne Road 
828 Dwyer Road 
89 Old Dam Neck Road 
Fitztown Road 
Indian River Road 
Knott's Island Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
Muddy Creek Road 
Munden Road 
North Muddy Creek 
North Muddy Creek 
22 4 5 Old Pungo Ferry 

Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
Salem Road 
West Neck Road 
West Neck Road 
2061 Pleasant Ridge Road 
449 Blackwater Road 
6 43 Princess Anne Road 
2565 Seaboard Road 
Holland Road 

1377 Princess Anne Road 
3300 Harlie Court 



r 



Page No. 6 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of Surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134-0696- Nimmo Methodist church 

134-0190- Nosay House 

134-0305- oak Grove 

134-0253- Old Charity School Auditorium 

134-0044- Old Fentress House 

134-0205- Old Morris Neck Farm 

134-0151- Piney Grove Church Hall 

134-0399- Pleasant Ridge School for Blacks 

134-0171- Pocahantas Hunt Club 

134-0324- Presck Farm 

Dr. Baum House 

134-0029- Princess Anne County Court House 

134-0666- Pungo Grill 

134-0708- Quail Run Farm, 2220 Indian River Road 

134-0690- Salem United Methodist Church 

134-0679- Sandbridge Texaco 

134-0218- Ship's Place 

134-0702- St. John's Baptist Church 

134-0719- Stewart House 

134-0288- Store, 1500 Princess Anne Road 

Napa Store 

134-0662- Store, 604 Princess Anne Road 

134-0661- Store/Dwelling Princess Anne Road 

134-0080- Tabernacle Methodist Church 

134-0724- Trinity Tabernacle Fellowship 

134-0070- Venrill 

134-0173- Waterfield Place 

134-0069- Weston House 

134-0248- whitehurst Farm 



2200 Princess Anne Road 
550 Princess Anne Road 
700 Princess Anne Road 

Pleasant Ridge Road 
1660 Princess Anne Road 
1641 Mill Landing Road 

Holland Road 
1392 Princess Anne Road 
6216 Pochahantas Club 
6269 Crags Causeway 

2408 North Landing Road 
1785 Princess Anne Road 
2220 Indian River Road 
2 048 Salem Road 

Princess Anne Road 
1409 Drum Point Road 

Holland Road 
4600 Old Princess Anne Road 
1500 Princess Anne Road 

6 04 Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Road 
1265 Sandbridge Road 
Providence Road 
2368 Princess Anne Road 
268 Princess Anne Road 
2380 Princess Anne Road 
3312 Charity Neck Road 



Page No. 7 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 

Virginia Beach Name and Addresses of Surveyed Properties 

VDHR # Name of Property Address 



05/28/1993 



134-0246- Whitehurst House 

Witch of Pungo House 
1328 North Muddy Creek Rd 
134-0722- William E. Wood House 
134-0038- Woodhouse, Johnathan House 



1328 North Muddy Creek Rd. 



1805 Kempsville Road 
2 380 London Bridge Road 



APPENDIX C 



Page No. 1 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 
VA Beach Report by ID Number-Intensive Properties 
VDHR File # Year Built Address 



05/28/1993 
USGS Quad Map 



134-0006- 1830- 

134-0011- 1790- 

134-0038- 1760 

134-0044- I860- 

134-0062- 1888 

134-0072- 1772 

134-0115- 1840- 

134-0169- 1880- 

134-0171- 1926- 

134-0196- 1880- 

134-0205- 1880- 

134-0246- 1870- 

134-0248- 1860- 

134-0302- 1910- 

134-0305- 1880- 

134-0320- 1830- 

134-0351- 1790- 

134-0362- 1820- 

134-0367- 1835- 

134-0382- 1924 

134-0392- 1860- 

134-0396- 1870- 

134-0404- 1894 

134-0550- 1880- 

134-0666- 1919 

134-0688- 1850- 

134-0694- 1860- 

134-0704- 1880- 

134-0708- 1900- 

134-0710- 1900- 
TABLE 3: 



-1850 2176 
-1820 

ca 2380 

-1890 1660 

1569 

ca 

-1880 572 

-1910 129 

-1931 6216 
-1910 

-1910 1641 

-1880 1328 

-1880 3312 

-1917 684 

-1910 700 

-1860 2968 

-1820 3173 

■1860 4152 

■1860 773 

ca 2216 

■1880 1255 

■1890 2254 

ca 1464 

■1900 1533 

ca 1785 

■1890 3004 

■1880 1685 

•1910 828 

■1920 2220 

■1920 

PROPERTIES 



Oceana Boulevard 

Cheswick Lane 

London Bridge Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Holland Road 

Oceana Blvd 

Princess Anne Road 

Pochahantas club Road 

Munden Road 

Mill Landing Road 

North Muddy Creek Rd. 

charity Neck Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Indian Creek Road 

Land of Promise Road 

Blackwater Road 

Princess Anne Road 

stowe Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Vaughan Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Salem Road 

Princess Anne Road 

Seaboard Road 

Muddy Creek Road 

Dwyer Road 

Indian River Road 

West Neck Road 

WITH NATIONAL REGISTER 



Princess Anne 

Kempsville 

Princess Anne 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Princess Anne 

Princess Anne 

Creeds 

Creeds 

Creeds 

Pleasant Ridge 

North Bay 

North Bay 

Creeds 

Creeds 

Creeds 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Kempsville 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 

Princess Anne 

Virginia Beach 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pleasant Ridge 
POTENTIAL 



Page No. 2 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES 05/28/1993 

VA Beach Report by ID Number-Intensive Properties 

VDHR File # Year Built Address USGS Quad Map 



134-0711- 1860-1890 Knott's Island Road Knott's Island 

134-0721- 1880-1910 5857 Providence Road Kempsville 

32 RECORDS IN THIS REPORT 



APPENDIX D 



roENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 

Address Date of Construction 



6408 Knott's Island Road 

2628 North Landing Road 

2728 North Landing Road 

2818 North Landing Road 

2824 North Landing Road 

3000 North Landing Road 
The Original Children's Home 

3465 North Landing Road 

North Landing Road 
North Landing Grocery 

2773 Salem Road 

2605 Salem Road 

2283 Salem Road 

4081 Elbow Road 

Elbow Road-Cedar Ridge Stables 

3808 Indian River Road 

3253 Indian River Road 

3201 Indian River Road 

3517 West Neck Road 

3769 West Neck Road 

4053 West Neck Road (134-407) 

2253 Jarvis Road (134-401) 

Jarvis Road; No number, abandoned 

1376 Princess Anne Road (134-260) 

1217 Princess Anne Road (134-389) 

1130 Princess Anne Road (134-386) 

1101 Princess Anne Road 

2172 North Stowe Road (134-383) 

2264 Stowe Road 

2345 South Stowe Road (134-380) 

969 Princess Anne Road (134-379) 



1910-1930 
1880-1900 
1880-1910 
1920-1940 
1920-1940 
1880-1910 

1880-1910 
1900-1920 

1880-1910 
1900-1940 
1880-1910 
1920-1940 
1880-1910 
1920-1940 
1920-1940 
1880-1910 
1880-1910 
1880-1910 
1880-1910 
1900-1920 
1880-1910 
1890-1920 
1880-1910 
1880-1910 
1920-1940 
1880-1910 
1880-1900 
1870-1900 
1900-1920 (Altered 1910-30) 



Type of Building 

Dwelling 

Dwelling (L-House) 
Dwelling (L-House) 
Dwelling (Bungalow) 
Dwelling (Bungalow) 
Dwelling (I-House) 

Dwelling 
Commercial Building 

Dwelling 

Dwelling (Bungalow) 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling (I-House) 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling (Bungalow) 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 

Dwelling 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 



Address 

948 Princess Anne Road (134-373) 

905 Princess Anne Road (134-360) 

909 Princess Anne Road (134-370) 

772 Princess Anne Road (134-366) 

2234 Old Pungo Feny Road (134-307) 

691 Princess Anne Road (134-304) 
Church 

680 Princess Anne Road (134-301) 

665 Princess Anne Road 
Church 

5553 Buzzard's Neck Road (134-298) 

5544 Buzzard's Neck Road (134-297) 

5588 Buzzard's Neck Road (134-299) 

5605 Buzzard's Neck Road (134-300) 

636 Princess Anne Road (134-295) 

612 Princess Anne Road (134-292) 

Princess Anne Road (134-191) 

6140 Pocahantas Club Road (134-171) 

6168 Pocahantas Club Road 

1626 Back Bay Landing Road (134-178) 

1505 Back Bay Landing Road 

5920 Fitztown Road (134-182) 

5701 Fitztown Road (134-185) 

5634 Morris Neck Road 

5612 Morris Neck Road 

5600 Morris Neck Road 

5172 Morris Neck Road 

4921 Morris Neck Road (134-200) 

4904 Morris Neck Road (134-201) 

4853 Morris Neck Road (134-202) 

1345 Mill Landing Road (134-206) 



Date of Construction 


Type of Building 


1920-1940 


Ehvelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Church 


1925-1940 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Church 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1900-1920 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 (Altered) 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 (Altered) 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling (1 -story, Ell) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1920-1940 


Dwelling 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 



Address 

1217 Mill Landing Road (134-203) 

1564 Mill Landing Road (134-204) 

1628 Stone Road (134-201) 

1808 Nanney's Creek Road (134-209) 

1769 Nanney's Creek Road (134-210) 

1633 Nanney's Creek Road (134-211) 

1601 Nanney's Creek Road 

1584 Nanney's Creek Road 

1560 Nanney's Creek Road (134-214) 

1529 Nanney's Creek Road (134-215) 

Catfish Road (134-219) 
Drum Point Hunt Club 

4381 Muddy Creek Road (134-221) 

1376 Ship's Cabin Road (134-222) 

1325 Ship's Cabin Road (134-223) 

4237 Muddy Creek Road (134-225) 

4104 Muddy Creek Road (134-227) 

4073 Muddy Creek Road (134-228) 

4057 Muddy Creek Road (134-230) 

3977 Muddy Creek Road (134-232) 

3910 Muddy Creek Road (134-233) 

1368 Pleasant Ridge Road (134-281) 

1613 Pleasant Ridge Road 

1825 Pleasant Ridge Road (134-284) 

1877 Pleasant Ridge Road (134-285) 

1945 Pleasant Ridge Road (134-286) 

1533 Princess Anne Road (134-60) 

1576 Princess Anne Road (134-409) 

1646 Princess Anne Road (134-411) 

1740 Princess Anne Road 

1757 Princess Anne Road 



Date of Construction 


Type of Building 


1940-1960 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


EKvelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling (1 -story) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1900-1920 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1890-1920 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1900-1920 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 



Address 

1761 Princess Anne Road 

1764 Princess Anne Road 

1864 Indian River Road 

1812 Indian River Road 

3456 Charity Neck Road 

3608 Charity Neck Road 

3676 Charity Neck Road 

3892 Charity Neck Road 

3905 Charity Neck Road 

3972 Charity Neck Road 

4021 Charity Neck Road 

4121 Charity Neck Road 

4156 Charity Neck Road 

4192 Charity Neck Road 

4220 Charity Neck Road 

4300 Charity Neck Road 

4313 Charity Neck Road 

1448 Gum Bridge Road 

1556 Gum Bridge Road 

1789 Gum Bridge Road (134-275) 

3685 North Muddy Creek Road (134-234) 

3620 North Muddy Creek Road (134-235) 

3554 North Muddy Creek Road (134-238) 

3529 North Muddy Creek Road (134-240) 

3497 North Muddy Creek Road (134-241) 

Horn Point Road 

North Muddy Creek Road; Abandoned 

1788 North Muddy Creek Road 

5607 Blackwater Road (134-309) 
Post Office 



Date of Construction 


Type of Building 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 (Altered) 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Commercial 



3125 Hungarian Road (134-311) 



1890-1920 



Dwelling 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 



Address 


Date of Construction 


Type of Building 


3361 Hungarian Road 


1880-1910 


(Abandoned) 


Agricultural buildings 


3457 Hungarian Road (134-313) 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


5712 Blackwater Road 


1920-1940 






Dwelling 


5804 Blackwater Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


5924 Blackwater Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


2941 Indian Creek Road (134-321) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling 


3009 Indian Creek Road (134-322) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling 


6465 Craggs Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


6540 Craggs Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


2864 West Gibbs Road (134-333) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling 


2861 West Gibbs Road (134-332) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling 


6273 Blackwater Road 


1920-1940 1 


(Altered) 


Dwelling 


6336 Blackwater Road 


1880-1900 1 


(Altered) 


Church 


Princess Anne Church 










6633 Blackwater Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


6621 Blackwater Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


2948 Shirley Lane (134-315) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling (Bungalow) 


3248 Head River Road (134-340) 


1920-1940 






Dwelling (Bungalow) 


3268 Head River Road 


1920-1940 






Dwelling (Bungalow) 


3290 Head River Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


3332 Head River Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


3340 Head River Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


Head River Road 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


3609 Head River Road 


1880-1910 






EKvelling 


5072 Blackwater Road (134-346) 


1915-1930 ( 


(Altered) 


Dwelling 


3308 Old Carolina Road 


1880-1910 ( 


(Altered) 


Dwelling 


3489 Old Carolina Road 


1920-1940 






Dwelling (Bungalow) 


3564 Old Carolina Road (134-348) 


1880-1910 






Dwelling 


4700 Blackwater Road (134-357) 


1915-1930 






Dwelling 


4280 Blackwater Road (134-360) 


1860-1880 






Dwelling 


1737 Sandbridge Road 


1920-1940 






Dwelling (4-Square) 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES NOT SURVEYED 



Address 

1228 Sandbridge Road 

1225 Sandbridge Road 

Mc Clannan Lane 

3028 Colchester Road 

865 Sandbridge Road 

819 Sandbridge Road 

661 Sandbridge Road 

3016 New Bridge Road 

3049 New Bridge Road 

3161 New Bridge Road 

3024 New Bridge Road 

1593 Ranagan's Lane 

1705 Flanagan's Lane 

2817 Seaboard Road 

2773 Seaboard Road 

2701 Seaboard Road 

2573 Leroy Road 

2381 Seaboard Road 

2841 Princess Anne Road 

2373 Princess Anne Road 

2388 Princess Anne Road 
Brown's Body Shop 

2512 Princess Anne Road 

2733 Princess Anne Road 

2645 Princess Anne Road 
Princess Anne Lodge 

2491 Holland Road 

2653 Holland Road 
Pleasant Acres Farm 

Holland Road 

Burroughs House 



Date of Construction 


Type of Building 


1880-1910 


E>welling 


18801-1910 


EKvelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 (Altered) 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Ehvelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1920-1940 


Dwelling (Bungalow) 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Commercial Building 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 


1880-1900 


Commercial Building 


1920-1940 


Dwelling 


1880-1910 


Dwelling 



1840-1860 (Denied Access) Dwelling 



APPENDIX E 



PRELIMINARY INFORMATION FORM 

The following constitutes an application for preliminary consideration for the nomination 
potential of a property to the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic 
Places. This does not mean that a property is being nominated to the registers at this time. 
Rather it is being evaluated to determine if it qualifies for such listings. Applicants will be 
notified of the board's actions in writing shortly after the meeting. 

Please type and use 8 l/2"x 11" paper if additional space is needed. 

All submitted materials become the property of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources 
and cannot be returned. 

1. HISTORIC NAME OF PROPERTY (if historic name is not know, use current name or 
address.) 

Baxter House 

2. LOCATION 

A. Street or Route 3173 Land of Promise Road 

B. County or City Virginia Beach 

3. LEGAL OWNER(S) OF PROPERTY-Include names and addresses of all owners. 
Attach additional sheet if necessary. 

Circle one: Mr. Mrs. Miss Ms. Ralph and Irene Frost 

ADDRESS 3173 Land of Promise Road 

CITY/STATE Virginia Beach. VA ZIP 23456 

In the event of corporate ownership you must provide the name of the appropriate contact 

person. DAYTIME 

CONTACT PERSON PHONE 



SIGNATURE DATE 

(Signature of owner or contact person is required for processing all applications.) 



4. GENERAL DATA 

A. Type of property: Dwelling 

B. Date(s) of resource(s): ca. 1857 

C. Outbuildings: Yes No ; if yes, number of outbuildings 

D. Approximate acreage: 93.6 acres 

E. Architect or carpenter/Mason (if Known): 

F. Original Use: Dwelling 

G. Present Use: Ehvelling 

5. GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Note architectural features, additions, remodelings and any alterations not 
apparent in photographs. Description should also address setting and any 
landscape features. Additional information may be submitted on typed, 
consecutively numbered 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 



EXTERIOR 

The Baxter House, located at 3173 Land of Promise Road, is a two-and-half-story, wood frame, 
side-gable dwelling on a raised brick foundation. The house is set back approximately 50 yards 
from the road; it is approached with a gravel drive. The surrounding landscape is comprised of 
agricultural fields with large mature oak trees flanking the house. To the east are modern 
agricultural buildings and farmhouses. 

The Baxter House, constructed circa 1857, was designed as a vernacular interpretation of the 
Federal style. Its simple symmetrical five-bay facade features a barely three -bay wide portico 
sheltering the centrally placed front entry. Though simple in expression, its massing, proportions, 
fenestration and porch clearly establish its Federal period association. 

The facade (north) is raised as the house stands on a foundation of brick piers. The shed roof of 
the shed roof of the portico is supported by square, fluted columns. The turned-spindle 
balustrade is capped by a round railing. The stairs leading to the portico do not appear to be 
original. The raised foundation is constructed with varying brick bonds including Remish bond 
and 3-course American bond. The walls are clad with beaded weatherboard edged with 
comerboards. The windows vary in size and in the number of lights as they progress from the 
basement to the second story. The basement windows are 6/6, double-hung wood sash; the first 
story features elongated 9/9, double-hung wood sash windows; and the second story has 9/6, 
double-hung wood sash windows. The window surrounds are plain with sills slightly projecting. 
The side-gable, standing-seam metal roof has a boxed cornice on the front and rear facades. The 
one remaining interior end chimney is ornamented by a corbelled cap. 

The rear (south) elevation includes a seven-bay shed roof addition, constructed in the 1880s, 
which rests on a brick pier foundation. The basement story of the rear addition is enclosed by 
screens with two entries. The windows vary in size and in the number of lights. The two bays on 
the southwest corner are elongated 9/9, double-hung, wood sash windows. The remaining 
windows are 6/6, double-hung wood sash in various sizes. A single-panelled entry door with a 
bracketed shed roof, in the central bay, is accessed by wooden replacement stairs. 



The two-bay west elevation has been repaired at the basement story. In 1985, the interior end 
brick chimney was struck by lightning and collapsed. The chimney was subsequently removed and 
a 6/6, double-hung window set in concrete block was installed. 



INTERIOR 

The interior plan is organized around a central hall which is flanked by single parlors. The hall is 
enhanced by panelled wood wainscoting, topped by a projecting chair rail. The dog-leg stairs, 
located on the east interior wall, have a square rail and balusters terminating at the simple square 
newel. Wide crown molding and base molding ornament the hall. 

The east parlor has a projecting chimney breast enhanced by a tall Federal style mantle. The 
large room has hardwood floors, chair rail, wainscoting, and base molding. The doors are 
composed of four cross panels. The west parlor, although identical in ornamentation and form to 
the east parlor, has been altered. Due to removal of the chimney, the fireplace opening was 
enclosed and the mantel removed. The tall Federal style mantle with a detailed projecting shelf is 
ornamented with carved paterae and remains at the site. A removable wall with two entries was 
constructed at the west end of the room to allow for closet space. 

The rear addition, with the original exterior windows and weatherboard of the main house serving 
as interior walls, has beaded board walls and ceilings. This addition contains two bedrooms and 
the only bathroom installed in the dwelling. 

The second story has two large bed chambers ornamented by a projecting chair rail, base and 
crown molding, and hard wood floors. The east bed chamber has a tall Federal mantle applied to 
the projecting chimney breast. The chimney opening in the west room is enclosed and the mantle 
removed, although remains on site. A small room, located off the hall between the bed chambers, 
has the same architectural detailing. The wide wood doors are made up of six panels with six 
cross panels. 

The basement level has the modem kitchen to the west with a narrow quarter flight of stairs in 
the central hall to the east. The east room of the basement, currently a living room, has a 
moderately detailed Federal mantle and simple window surrounds. 



6. HISTORY 

Briefly note any significant events, personages, and/or families associated with the 
property. (Detailed family genealogies are not necessary). Please list any additional 
sources of information. Only material contained on the form will be forwarded to the 
Review Board members. Additional information may be submitted on typed consecutively 
numbered 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 

Tax Assessment Records, located at the Virginia State Library and Archives in Richmond, 
indicate that the dwelling at 3173 Land of Promise Road was constructed in 1857 by Isaac B. 
Baxter on property originally owned by his father, Isaac N. Baxter. Isaac N. Baxter was a local 
doctor with land holdings in Greenwich, Kempsville, and Blackwater. 



The large tract of Blackwater area farm land owned by the Baxter Family was in the family prior 
to its division according to the will of Isaac N. Baxter in 1855. The land where the dwelling was 
constructed was deeded to his son, Isaac B. Baxter. It remained in the Baxter Family until 1942 
when it was sold to Arthur Pinkston. Pinkston proceeded to purchase surrounding tracts of land 
and subsequently reunited the early subdivided land holdings of Isaac N. Baxter. In 1958, 
Pinkston sold all of the property he held in the Blackwater area to Irene and Ralph Frost, the 
current owners. 

The Baxter House is presently a rental property, surrounded by active agricultural fields. Over 
the years, several modern dwellings and farm buildings to the east, and one to the west, have 
been constructed on the site of the Baxter House. The current owners reside on site. 

Chain of Title 

October 27, 1958: Deed #8576 Book 560 Page 505 
Arthur G. Pinkston TO Irene T. and Ralph Lee Frost 

November 20, 1942: Deed #2178 Book 215 Page 328 
Blanche Wood Baxter and Children TO Arthur G. Pinkston 

November 12, 1917: Book 103 Page 248 
Lavinia Baxter TO Joshua N. Baxter 

July 25, 1855: Will Book 4 Pages 376-378 
Isaac N. Baxter TO Isaac B. and Lavinia Baxter 

Because of the extensive land holdings of Isaac N. Baxter, documentation prior to 1855 does not 
provide enough specific information to determine when and from whom Isaac N. Baxter obtained 
the property. 

Tax Assessment Records 

1855: # of Acres = 752 

Value of land per acre = $8.68 
Total value of property = $6,527.36 

1856: # of Acres = 752 

Value of land per acre = $8.68 
Total value of property = $6,527.36 

1857: # of Acres = 752 

Value of land per acre = $16.00 
Total value of property = $12,032.00 

1858: # of Acres = 752 

Value of land per acre = $16.00 
Total value of property = $12,032.00 

1859: # of Acres = 752 

Value of land per acre = $16.00 
Total value of property = $12,023.00 



7. REASON FOR REQUEST: 

The research and documentation for the Baxter House was conducted as part of the Survey of the 
City of Virginia Beach Phase IL 



8. PHOTOGRAPHS 

At least four current interior and four exterior photographs, preferably black and white, must 
be provided. Photographs of other buildings on the property and views of the general 
setting would also be helpful. The inclusion of photographs is essential to the completion 
of this application. Without photographs, the application cannot be considered and will be 
returned. Photographs should be labeled on the reverse in pencil and should not be 
mounted or affixed in any way. 

Intensive level interior and exterior photographs accompany the Phase II Report compiled by 
Traceries. 



9. MAP 

Please include a map showing the location of the property. A sketch map is acceptable, 
but please note street and route numbers. Any outbuildings on the property should also 
be noted. Please include a north arrow. This form cannot be processed without a map 
showing the property's exact location. 

10. Is the property incoming producing? Yes No If so, will the applicant seek to use the 
Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit? Yes No 

11. Additional comments: 



12. APPLICANT INFORMATION (Person completing form) 

NAME Traceries TELEPHONE C 202 1 232-6870 

ADDRESS 1606 Twentieth Street. N.W.. 

CITY/STATE Washington. D.C. ZIP CODE 20009 
SIGNATURE DATE June 1. 1993 



Departmental policy requires that the following officials of the local jurisdiction be notified prior 
to any consideration of eligibility by the State Review Board. Please provide the names and 
addresses of those currently serving, as applicable. This information must be provided before the 
Preliminary Information Form can be presented to the State Review Board for consideration. 



Mayor of city or town: 



Meyera E. Qberndorf 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach. VA 23456 
(804^ 427-4581 



Chairman, Board of Supervisors: 
(for county and town properties) 



City or Town Manager or County Administrator: 



James K. Sporr 



Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Director, City or County Planning Department: 



Robert J.Scott 



Department of Planning And Zoning 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Chairman, City or County Planning Commission: 



Dan Ariss 



Chairman, Planning Commission 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



City Council member or County Supervisor 
in whose district the property is located: 



John A Baum 



6465 Crags Causeway 
Virginia Beach. VA 23457 



r804') 421-2652 



(Optional) Name and address of contact person 
for local historic preservation group: 



PRELIMINARY INFORMATION FORM 

The following constitutes an application for preliminary consideration for the nomination 
potential of a property to the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic 
Places. This does not mean that a property is being nominated to the registers at this time. 
Rather it is being evaluated to determine if it qualifies for such listings. Applicants will be 
notified of the board's actions in writing shortly after the meeting. 

Please type and use 8 l/2"x 11" paper if additional space is needed. 

All submitted materials become the property of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources 
and cannot be returned. 

1. HISTORIC NAME OF PROPERTY (if historic name is not know, use current name or 
address.) 

Pocahontas Fowling Club 

2. LOCATION 

A. Street or Route 6216 Pocahontas Club Road 



B. County or City Virginia Beach 



LEGAL OWNER(S) OF PROPERTY-Include names and addresses of all owners. 
Attach additional sheet if necessary. 

Circle one: Mr. Mrs. Miss Ms. Mark and Diane Gresalfi 



ADDRESS 6216 Pocahontas Club Road 



CITY/STATE Virginia Beach. VA ZIP 23456 

In the event of corporate ownership you must provide the name of the appropriate contact 
person. DAYTIME 

CONTACT PERSON PHONE 

SIGNATURE DATE 

(Signature of owner or contact person is required for processing all applications.) 



GENERAL DATA 

A Type of property: Dwelling 

B. Date(s) of resource(s): 1926-1931 

C. Outbuildings: Yes No ; if yes, number of outbuildings 

D. Approximate acreage: 4.08 acres 

E. Architect or carpenter/Mason (if Known): 

F. Original Use: Fowling Clubhouse 

G. Present Use: Dwelling 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Note architectural features, additions, remodelings and any alterations not 
apparent in photographs. Description should also address setting and any 
landscape features. Additional information may be submitted on typed, 
consecutively numbered 8 1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 



EXTERIOR 

The Pocahontas Fowling Clubhouse, located at 6216 Pocahontas Club Road, is sited on the Back 
Bay just north of the North CarolinaA'irginia border. Presented in a modest expression of the 
Shingle Style, the two-story, wood frame clubhouse (now a single family dwelling) is seven bays 
wide and three bays deep. The clubhouse is set back approximately 50 yards from Pocahontas 
Club Road. It is obscured from general view by a winding gravel drive and mature trees. The 
yard immediately surrounding the lodge is landscaped with boxwood, dating back to the original 
construction of the building. Several rural dwellings have been constructed along Pocahontas 
Club Road but the clubhouse site remains visually intact. 

The Pocahontas Fowling Clubhouse, constructed between 1926 and 1931, appears as a large 
dwelling. Although no architect has been identified with this building, its volumetric massing, 
steeply hipped roofs with overhanging eaves, varied fenestration, and shingled surfaces associate it 
with the early twentieth century academic Shingle Style architecture. The H-shaped lodge has a 
hipped and cross-gabled roof with overhanging eaves and exposed rafters; it is clad with slate 
shingles. The wood shingle walls are supported on a log foundation with brick infill at the 
building-line. The 6/6, double-hung, wood sash windows vary in size and shape. The window 
surrounds have a projecting cornice and sill. Two windows have been added and three enlarged 
on the rear elevation. A central interior chimney projects from the hipped roof at the west end, 
while an exterior end chimney pierces the overhanging roof on the southeast elevation. The 
chimneys are 6-course American brick bond. 

The main (north) facade has entries located within each section of the H-shape. The entry 
surrounds on the projecting corner bays have pilasters and a denticulated cornice. The entry 
doors are panelled with 6 lights. The main entry, in the middle bay of the central section, has a 
hipped roof portico with exposed roof rafters. The portico is supported by wood shingled posts 
with decorative square columns in the front. The south elevation has a two bay wide shed roof 
addition. The addition has the same wood shingled posts and decorative square columns as the 
front portico. 



INTERIOR 

The front entry, of the H-shap6d interior, leads to a narrow hall that runs the width of the central 
section. The hall provides access to a large "Great Room" at the east end. This room, the main 
public lounge of the clubhouse, has vertical wood panelled walls with bevelled edges. Built-in 
cabinets and shelves line the north wall. The projecting chimney breast has a large mantle with a 
projecting shelf and dentil molding. A compass, made of copper and frosted glass, is in the center 
of the ceiling and is attached to a weathervane on the roof of the lodge. 

In the central section of the H-shape is a small sitting room with entries from the main hall, the 
kitchen to the west, and the "Great Room." This room has wide baseboard molding and 
projecting window sills. The kitchen, in its original location, has recently been renovated and 
modern appliances have been installed. Built-in cupboards from the lodge are the only original 
feature of this room. The kitchen opens onto a dining area that has had one wall removed to 
allow the original straight-flight stairs be have a double-entry. The rooms under the stairs 
originally provided office space and a gun storage room. The built-in cupboards of the gun room 
remain while the office space was renovated to provide a modern bathroom. 

The boxed stairwell in the projecting northeast bay is a quarter-flight with bevelled vertical 
wainscoting with a round hand rail applied to the wall. The second floor has eight bed chambers, 
each with round front lavatories with a wall slab. The bed chambers have baseboard and picture 
molding, projecting sills and the original two-light electric cord shower lighting in the ceiling. The 
metal room numbers still remain on the five panelled doors. The two bathrooms, located in a 
portion of the projecting bays on the south side, have been renovated. To the west on the 
second floor is the locker room which is clad with horizontal beaded board. The markings from 
the locker locations can be seen on the hardwood floor. 



OUTBUILDINGS 

A three-car garage with a second story apartment was constructed in 1991. It was designed in the 
same architectural vocabulary as the lodge. A second outbuilding, a one-story, wood-frame wood- 
shingled office/dwelling, also in a similar architectural presentation, was not evaluated. 



6. HISTORY 

Briefly note any significant events, personages, and/or families associated with the 
property. (Detailed family genealogies are not necessary). Please list any additional 
sources of information. Only material contained on the form will be forwarded to the 
Review Board members. Additional information may be submitted on typed consecutively 
numbered 8 1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 

The Pocahontas Fowling Club, Inc., incorporated on May 21, 1903 by the Commonwealth of 
Virginia, was established by a group of Norfolk, Virginia sportsmen in 1904. The Fowling Club 
began to purchase land on the high ground and marsh area on the west side of Back Bay. In 
1905 the club acquired additional parcels of marsh land through a grant from the Commonwealth 
of Virginia. A deed from October 1905, granting a right-of-way for the erection of telephone 
poles and wires from the railroad station to a club located on Back Bay, provides the earliest 



known documentation for the existence of a clubhouse owned by the Pocahontas Fowling Club. 
The Fowling Club entertained such distinguished guests as President William Howard Taft and 
Senator A. Willis Robertson, and many admirals, generals, and other notables. In 1914, the 
Norfolk founders sold the Club and part of the property to a group of wealthy northern 
sportsmen. 

The original one-story clubhouse was destroyed in the early 1920s. In the mid- 1920s or early 
1930s, the Fowling Club constructed a new clubhouse that was more elaborate than any in the 
area. There is no known architect. The appearance of the lodge is in keeping with its 
recreational purpose. It originally consisted of eight bed chambers, two baths, servants' quarters, 
a large "Grreat Room," and central heating. By 1944, another group of Norfolk sportsmen 
purchased the property. The Pocahontas Fowling Club and all of its land holdings, were 
purchased by the Commonwealth of Virginia in 1963. The Pocahontas Marsh became an initial 
part of the Pocahontas/Trojan Waterfowl Management Area and is now used for public hunting.^ 



The Clubhouse, including all contents of the lodge, boats, shooting blinds, and hunting apparatus, 
were immediately sold to Virginia corporation. The property was eventually sold in 1972 to 
private owners although it remained unoccupied. In 1992, it was sold to Mark and Diane 
Gresalfi, who are rehabilitating the building, adapting the clubhouse into a single family dwelling. 

Chain of Title 

June 26, 1992: Book 3105 Page 611 
Ida Slattery TO Mark and Diane Gresalfi 

March 13. 1979: Book 1886 Page 527 

Charles P. and Grace M. O'Brien TO Joseph and Ida Slattery 

March 23, 1972: Book 1265 Page 633 

Ross, Inc. TO Charles P. and Grace M. O'Brien 

August 12, 1964: Book 864 Page 60 
Commonwealth of Virginia TO Jack R. Wilkins 
Jack R. Wilson is President of Ross, Inc. 

July 8, 1963: Book 799 Page 426 

Pocahontas Club, Inc. TO Commonwealth of Virginia 

4.08 Acres of the property 

November 27, 1931: Book 166 Page 148 

George F. Williams TO Pocahontas Fowling Club, Inc. 

October 1, 1896: Book 67 Page 353 

J. Keeling and Wm. Whitehurst TO George F. Williams 



^Johnson, Archie & Bud Coppedge. Gun Clubs & Decovs of Back Bay & Currituck Sound . (CurBac Press: Virginia Beach, 
1991), pp. 55-57. 



One Acre of the property 

October 1. 1944: Book 224A Page 259 

C. Goodwin Carter TO Pocahontas Club, Inc. 

1914 

Pocahontas Fowling Club, Inc. TO Edwin A. Carter 

July 22, 1904: Book 74 Page 444 

Grandy D. Doxey, et ux, et als TO Pocahontas Fowling Club, Inc. 



7. REASON FOR REQUEST: 

The research and documentation for the Pocahontas Fowhng Club, Inc. was conducted as part of 
the Survey of the City of Virginia Beach Phase II. 



8. PHOTOGRAPHS 

At least four current interior and four exterior photographs, preferably black and white, must 
be provided. Photographs of other buildings on the property and views of the general 
setting would also be helpful. The inclusion of photographs is essential to the completion 
of this application. Without photographs, the application cannot be considered and will be 
returned Photographs should be labeled on the reverse in pencil and should not be 
mounted or affixed in any way. 

Intensive level interior and exterior photographs accompany the Phase II Report compiled by 
Traceries. 

9. MAP 

Please include a map showing the location of the property. A sketch map is acceptable, 
but please note street and route numbers. Any outbuildings on the property should also 
be noted. Please include a north arrow. This form cannot be processed without a map 
showing the property's exact location. 

10. Is the property incoming producing? Yes No If so, will the applicant seek to use the 
Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit? Yes No 

11. Additional comments: 



12. APPLICANT INFORMATION (Person completing form) 

NAME Traceries TELEPHONE ( 202 ) 232-6870 

ADDRESS 1606 Twentieth Street. N.W.. 

CITY/STATE Washington. D.C. ZIP CODE 20009 
SIGNATURE DATE June 1. 1993 



Departmental policy requires that the following officials of the local jurisdiction be notified prior 
to any consideration of eligibility by the State Review Board. Please provide the names and 
addresses of those currently serving, as applicable. This information must be provided before the 
Prehminary Information Form can be presented to the State Review Board for consideration. 



Mayor of city or town: 



Meyera E. Oberndorf 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach. VA 23456 
r8041 427-4581 



Chairman, Board of Supervisors: 
(for county and town properties) 



City or Town Manager or County Administrator: 



James K. Sporr 



Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Director, City or County Planning Department: 



Robert J.Scott 



Department of Planning And Zoning 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Chairman, City or County Planning Commission: 



Dan Ariss 



Chairman. Planning Commission 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



City Council member or County Supervisor 
in whose district the property is located: 



Paul J. Lanteigne 



4752 Stone Road 



Virginia Beach. VA 23457 



(804) 721-5535 



(Optional) Name and address of contact person 
for local historic preservation group: 



PRELIMINARY INFORMATION FORM 

The following constitutes an application for preliminary consideration for the nomination 
potential of a property to the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic 
Places. This does not mean that a property is being nominated to the registers at this time. 
Rather it is being evaluated to determine if it qualifies for such listings. Applicants will be 
notified of the board's actions in writing shortly after the meeting. 

Please type and use 8 1/2" x 11" paper if additional space is needed. 

All submitted materials become the property of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources 
and cannot be returned. 

1. HISTORIC NAME OF PROPERTY (if historic name is not know, use current name or 
address.) 

Gresham-Ives House 

2. LOCATION 

A. Street or Route 2152 Blackwater Road 



B. County or City Virginia Beach 



3. LEGAL OWNER(S) OF PROPERTY-Include names and addresses of all owners. 

Attach additional sheet if necessary. 



Circle one: Mr. Mrs. Miss Ms. Jeb Stuart Ives, Jr. 



ADDRESS 2152 Blackwater Road 



CITY/STATE Virginia Beach. VA ZIP 23456 

In the event of corporate ownership you must provide the name of the appropriate contact 
person. DAYTIME 

CONTACT PERSON PHONE 

SIGNATURE DATE 



(Signature of owner or contact person is required for processing all applications.) 



4. GENERAL DATA 

A Type of property: Dwelling 

B. Date(s) of resource(s): ca. 1851 

C. Outbuildings: Yes No ; if yes, number of outbuildings 5 

D. Approximate acreage: 426 acres 

E. Architect or carpenter/Mason (if Known): 

F. Original Use: Dwelling 

G. Present Use: Dwelling 

5. GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Note architectural features, additions, remodelings and any alterations not 
apparent in photographs. Description should also address setting and any 
landscape features. Additional information may be submitted on typed, 
consecutively numbered 8 1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 

EXTERIOR 

The Gresham-Ives House, located at 4152 Blackwater Road, is a two-and-half-story, wood-frame 
farmhouse with a side-hall-double-parlor plan. The dwelling rests on a foundation of cut logs and 
brick piers. It is sited approximately 50 yards from Blackwater Road, just 100 yards south of the 
Pocaty River. The surrounding landscape is made up of active agricultural fields with a large 
open yard encircles the dwelling. The two contributing agricultural outbuildings stand to the 
northeast. 

The walls are clad with beaded wood weatherboard, with plain weatherboard on the north 
elevation. The windows are 9/6, double-hung wood sash on the first story and 6/6, double-hung 
wood sash on the second story. The shuttered windows are surrounded with flush boards with a 
slight sill projection. The steep side- gable, asphalt shingled roof has a boxed cornice on the front 
and rear facades. Double exterior end chimneys, set into the north elevation, are 5-course 
American brick bond. 

The three-bay front (west) facade features a hip-roof porch, nearly the width of the facade, which 
shelters the front entry. Supported by a brick pier foundation, the hipped roof porch is supported 
by turned posts. The front entry is set into the southernmost bay and has a wood and glass 
replacement door. 

The rear (east) elevation includes a one-story, extended front-gable addition. The addition 
extends three bays from the rear wall with an exterior concrete-block chimney on the north 
elevation. The pitched roof is clad with standing-seam metal with a projecting cornice. The brick 
pier foundation has been infilled with concrete. This addition has single-door entries on the 
north elevation and the east elevation. 

The three-bay south elevation of the main block has been altered at the first story with the 
insertion of a three-part window with 1/1, double-hung wood sash. The north elevation has 
several narrow 6/6 and 4/4, double-hung wood sash windows and flanking exterior chimneys. 



INTERIOR 

The two-and-one-half-story dwelling has a side-hall, double-parlor plan. The ceiling in the hall 
has decorative plaster with acanthus leaves. The quarter-turn flight of stairs is located in the 
southeast comer of the hall and has a square newel and balusters. The double parlors have 
Federal-style mantles with fluted pilasters and beaded molding. The fireplace openings have been 
enclosed and fitted for wood stoves. The second story contains two bed chambers, each with a 
decorative mantle. A narrow flight of quarter-turn stairs leads to a one-room attic. The roof is 
constructed of mortise and tenon joints held together with wooden pegs. 



OUTBUILDINGS and SITES 

Five agricultural outbuildings were constructed on the site in 1909. The barns have front-gable, 
standing-seam metal roofs clad with wood weatherboards. The outbuildings are constructed of 
queen trusses and machine wrought square nails. The Ives Family cemetery is located southeast 
of the dwelling and is currently surrounded by a wheat field. 



HISTORY 

Briefly note any significant events, personages, and/or families associated with the 
property. (Detailed family genealogies are not necessary). Please list any additional 
sources of information. Only material contained on the form will be forwarded to the 
Review Board members. Additional information may be submitted on typed consecutively 
numbered 8 1/2" x 11" sheets, as necessary. 

Tax Assessment Records, located at the Virginia State Library and Archives in Richmond, 
indicate that the dwelling at 4152 Blackwater Road was constructed in 1851 by Thomas B. 
Gresham. Originally from England, the Greshams were a wealthy Virginia farming family. 
Thomas B. Gresham was at one time the local sheriff and a County Commissioner. In 1860, the 
Gresham Farm is documented as having twenty-one slaves. 

Thomas B. Gresham began purchasing property in the Blackwater/Pocaty area as early as 1830. 
The land where Thomas B. Gresham, Sr. constructed the dwelling in 1851 was deeded in his Last 
Will and Testament, dated 1852, to his eldest daughter Brock Gresham. Brock Gresham refused 
to pay the $2,000 for the farm and it subsequently was presented to Thomas B. Gresham Jr. in 
lieu of his part in other real estate located in Virginia. A "Homestead" in Deed Book 52 Page 55 
removes all debt from property owned by Thomas B. Gresham and specifically mentions a 
farmhouse. 

Thomas B. Gresham and his wife, Permelia, sold the property in 1874 to Edwin Smith for $300.00. 
Edwin Smith then sold it to Edward B. and Fannie Ives in 1883. The Ives Family has owned and 
maintained the working farm for three generation. The dwelling, but not the agricultural fields, 
became a rental property in 1992. The Ives Family reside elsewhere on site in a contemporary 
dwelling. 



Chain of Title 

September 10, 1943: Book 220 Page 37 

E. Benson & Cornelia K. Ives TO Jeb S. Ives, Jr. 

January 2, 1883: Book 56 Page 169 
Edwin Smith TO Edward B. & Fannie Ives 

December 2, 1874: Book 52 Page 2 

Thomas B. & Permelia E. Gresham, Jr. TO Edwin Smith 

December, 1852: Will Book 4 Page 360 

Thomas B. Gresham, Sr. TO Thomas B. Gresham, Jr. 



Tax Assessment Records 

1849: # of Acres = 146 

Value of Land per acre = $13.16 
Total value of property = $1,921.36 

1850: # of Acres = 146 

Value of Land per acre = $13.16 
Total value of property = $1,921.36 

1851: # of Acres = 146 

Value of Land per acre = $20.55 
Total value of property = $3,000.30 

1852: # of Acres = 146 

Value of Land per acre = $20.55 
Total value of property = $3,000.30 

1853: # of Acres = 146 

Value of Land per acre = $20.55 
Total value of property = $3,000.30 



7. REASON FOR REQUEST: 

The research and documentation for the Gresham-Ives House was conducted as part of the 
Survey of the City of Virginia Beach Phase II. 



8. PHOTOGRAPHS 

At least four current interior and four exterior photographs, preferably black and white, must 
be provided. Photographs of other buildings on the property and views of the general 
setting would also be helpful. The inclusion of photographs is essential to the completion 
of this application. Without photographs, the application cannot be considered and will be 
returned. Photographs should be labeled on the reverse in pencil and should not be 
mounted or affixed in any way. 

Intensive level exterior photographs accompany the Phase II Report compiled by Traceries. 



9. MAP 

Please include a map showing the location of the property. A sketch map is acceptable, 
but please note street and route numbers. Any outbuildings on the property should also 
be noted. Please include a north arrow. This form cannot be processed without a map 
showing the property's exact location. 

10. Is the property incoming producing? Yes No If so, will the applicant seek to use the 
Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit? Yes No 

11. Additional comments: 

The interior of the farmhouse was not accessible because, despite the owners' permission, the 
tenant refused to allow anyone to enter. 



12. APPLICANT INFORMATION (Person completing form) 

NAME Traceries TELEPHONE ( 202 -) 232-6870 

ADDRESS 1606 Twentieth Street. N.W.. 

CITY/STATE Washington. D.C. ZIP CODE 20009 
SIGNATURE DATE June 1. 1993 



Departmental policy requires that the following officials of the local jurisdiction be notified prior 
to any consideration of eligibility by the State Review Board. Please provide the names and 
addresses of those currently serving, as applicable. This information must be provided before the 
Preliminary Information Form can be presented to the State Review Board for consideration. 



Mayor of city or town: 



Mevera E. Oberndorf 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach. VA 23456 
(8041 427-4581 



Chairman, Board of Supervisors: 
(for county and town properties) 



City or Town Manager or County Administrator: 



James K Sporr 



Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Director, City or County Planning Department: 



Robert J.Scott 



Department of Planning And Zoning 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



Chairman, City or County Planning Commission: 



Dan Ariss 



Chairman. Planning Commission 
Municipal Center 



Virginia Beach. VA 23456 



City Council member or County Supervisor 
in whose district the property is located: 



John A. Baum 



6465 Crags Causeway 
Virginia Beach. VA 23457 



(804) 421-2652 



(Optional) Name and address of contact person 
for local historic preservation group: 



10/30/98 ^ '^ ^U 



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